AR 670-1: Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Part 1)

Contents

  1. Part One General Information and Responsibilities
    1. Chapter 1: Introduction
      1. 1-1. Purpose
      2. 1-2. References
      3. 1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms
      4. 1-4. General
      5. 1-5. How to recommend changes to Army uniforms
      6. 1-6. Classification of service and utility or field uniforms
      7. 1-7. Personal appearance policies
      8. 1-8. Hair and fingernail standards and grooming policies
      9. Figure 1-1. Wear of mustache
      10. 1-9. Uniform appearance and fit
      11. 1-10. When the wear of the Army uniform is required or prohibited
      12. 1-11. Uniformity of material
      13. 1-12. Distinctive uniforms and uniform items
      14. 1-13. Wear of civilian clothing
      15. 1-14. Wear of jewelry
      16. 1-15. Wear of eyeglasses, sunglasses, and contact lenses
      17. 1-16. Wear of identification tags and security badges
      18. 1-17. Wear of personal protective or reflective clothing
      19. 1-18. Wear of organizational protective or reflective clothing
      20. 1-19. Restrictions on the purchase, possession, and reproduction of heraldic items
    2. Chapter 2: Responsibilities
      1. 2-1. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1
      2. 2-2. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4
      3. 2-3. The Institute of Heraldry
      4. 2-4. The U.S. Army Materiel Command
      5. 2-5. The U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service
      6. 2-6. Commanders
      7. 2-7. Responsibilities of soldiers purchasing uniforms, uniform items, and heraldic items
      8. 2-8. Operation of the Uniform Quality Control Program
    3. Part Two Utility and Selected Organization Uniforms
      1. Chapter 3: Temperate, Hot-Weather, and Enhanced Hot-Weather Battle Dress Uniforms
        1. 3-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 3-1. Temperate and hot-weather battle dress uniform, with beret, sleeves rolled
        3. Figure 3-2. Temperate and hot-weather battle dress uniform, with patrol cap, sleeves down
        4. 3-2. Composition and classification
        5. Figure 3-3. Cold-weather coat, camouflage (field jacket)
        6. 3-3. Occasions for wear
        7. 3-4. Insignia and accouterments
        8. 3-5. Headgear
        9. Figure 3-4. Wear of the beret, male and female
        10. 3-6. General guidelines
      2. Chapter 4: Maternity Work Uniform
        1. 4-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 4-1. Maternity work uniform
        3. 4-2. Composition and classification
        4. 4-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 4-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 4-5. General guidelines
      3. Chapter 5: Desert Battle Dress Uniform
        1. 5-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 5-1. Desert battle dress uniform, daytime pattern, officer, with desert BDU hat
        3. Figure 5-2. Desert battle dress uniform, daytime pattern, enlisted, with beret
        4. Figure 5-3. Desert BDU cap
        5. Figure 5-4. Desert battle dress uniform, nighttime pattern
        6. 5-2. Composition and classification
        7. 5-3. Occasions for wear
        8. 5-4. Insignia and accouterments
        9. 5-5. General guidelines
      4. Chapter 6: Aircrew Battle Dress Uniform
        1. 6-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 6-1. Aircrew battle dress uniform
        3. 6-2. Composition and classification
        4. 6-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 6-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 6-5. General guidelines
      5. Chapter 7: Cold-Weather Uniform
        1. 7-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 7-1. Cold-weather uniform
        3. 7-2. Composition and classification
        4. Figure 7-2. Cold-weather cap, camouflage
        5. Figure 7-3. Wool serge shirt, female
        6. 7-3. Occasions for wear
        7. 7-4. Insignia and accouterments
        8. 7-5. General guidelines
        9. 7-6. Extended cold-weather clothing system
        10. 7-7. Composition and classification
      6. Chapter 8: Hospital Duty Uniform Male
        1. 8-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 8-1. Hospital duty uniform, male
        3. 8-2. Composition and classification
        4. 8-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 8-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 8-5. General guidelines
      7. Chapter 9: Hospital Duty and Maternity Uniforms Female
        1. 9-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 9-1. Hospital duty dress, with beret
        3. Figure 9-2. Hospital duty pantsuit
        4. 9-2. Composition and classification
        5. 9-3. Occasions for wear
        6. 9-4. Insignia and accouterments
        7. 9-5. General guidelines
      8. Chapter 10: Food Service Uniform Male
        1. 10-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 10-1. Food service uniform, male
        3. 10-2. Composition and classification
        4. 10-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 10-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 10-5. General guidelines
      9. Chapter 11: Food Service and Maternity Uniforms Female
        1. 11-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 11-1. Food service uniform, female
        3. 11-2. Composition and classification
        4. 11-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 11-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 11-5. General guidelines
      10. Chapter 12: Flight Uniforms
        1. 12-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 12-1. Flight uniform, with beret
        3. 12-2. Composition and classification
        4. 12-3. Occasions for wear
        5. 12-4. Insignia and accouterments
        6. 12-5. General guidelines
      11. Chapter 13: Combat Vehicle Crewman Uniform
        1. 13-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 13-1. Combat vehicle crewman's uniform
        3. 13-2. Composition and classification
        4. Figure 13-2. Jacket, cold weather
        5. 13-3. Occasions for wear
        6. 13-4. Insignia and accouterments
        7. 13-5. General guidelines
      12. Chapter 14: Physical Fitness Uniform
        1. 14-1. Authorization for wear
        2. Figure 14-1. Improved physical fitness uniform variations
        3. Figure 14-1. Improved physical fitness uniform variationsContinued
        4. Figure 14-2. Physical fitness uniform
        5. 14-2. Composition and classification
        6. 14-3. Accessories
        7. 14-4. Occasions for wear
        8. 14-5. Insignia
        9. 14-6. General guidelines
      13. Part Three Service Uniforms
        1. Chapter 15: Army Green Service Uniform Male
          1. 15-1. Authorization for wear
          2. Figure 15-1. Army green service uniform, officer
          3. Figure 15-2. Beret, officer
          4. Figure 15-3. Beret, enlisted
          5. Figure 15-4. Garrison cap, officers
          6. Figure 15-5. Army green uniform, enlisted
          7. Figure 15-6. Garrison cap, enlisted
          8. Figure 15-7. Class B Army green uniform, long-sleeved shirt and tie
          9. Figure 15-8. Class B Army green uniform, short-sleeved shirt and tie
          10. 15-2. Composition
          11. 15-3. Classification
          12. 15-4. Occasions for wear
          13. 15-5. Materials
          14. 15-6. Coat, Army green
          15. 15-7. Trousers, Army green
          16. 15-8. Shirt, long- and short-sleeved
          17. Figure 15-9. Class B Army green uniform, short-sleeved shirt without tie
          18. 15-9. Headgear
          19. 15-10. Items normally worn with the Army green uniform
          20. 15-11. General guidelines
        2. Chapter 16: Army Green Service Uniform Female
          1. 16-1. Authorization for wear
          2. Figure 16-1. Army green uniform with slacks, officer
          3. Figure 16-2. Garrison cap, officer
          4. Figure 16-3. Berets, officer
          5. Figure 16-4. Beret, enlisted
          6. Figure 16-5. Army green uniform with skirt, enlisted
          7. Figure 16-6. Garrison cap, enlisted
          8. Figure 16-7. Class B variations of the Army green uniform, female
          9. Figure 16-7. Class B variations of the Army green uniform, femaleContinued
          10. 16-2. Composition
          11. 16-3. Classification
          12. 16-4. Occasions for wear
          13. 16-5. Materials
          14. 16-6. Coat, Army green
          15. 16-7. Slacks, Army green
          16. 16-8. Skirt, Army green
          17. 16-9. Shirts, long- and short-sleeved
          18. 16-10. Headgear
          19. 16-11. Items normally worn with the Army green uniform
          20. 16-12. General guidelines
        3. Chapter 17: Green Maternity Service Uniform
          1. 17-1. Authorization for wear
          2. Figure 17-1. Army green maternity service uniform, class A
          3. Figure 17-2. Army green maternity service uniform, class B
          4. 17-2. Composition
          5. 17-3. Classification
          6. 17-4. Occasions for wear
          7. 17-5. Materials
          8. 17-6. Tunic, Army green, maternity
          9. 17-7. Skirt, Army green, maternity
          10. 17-8. Slacks, Army green, maternity
          11. 17-9. Shirts, long- and short-sleeved, maternity
          12. 17-10. Headgear
          13. 17-11. Items normally worn with the Army green maternity uniform
          14. 17-12. General guidelines
        4. Part Four Dress Uniforms
          1. Chapter 18: Army White Uniform Male
            1. 18-1. Authorization for wear
            2. Figure 18-1. Army white uniform, officer
            3. Figure 18-2. Service cap, white, general and field grade officers
            4. Figure 18-3. Service cap, white, company grade officers
            5. Figure 18-4. Service cap, white, warrant officers
            6. Figure 18-5. Army white uniform, enlisted
            7. Figure 18-6. Service cap, white, enlisted
            8. 18-2. Composition
            9. 18-3. Occasions for wear
            10. 18-4. Materials
            11. 18-5. Coat, Army white
            12. 18-6. Trousers, Army white
            13. 18-7. Shirt, white
            14. 18-8. Service cap, Army white
            15. 18-9. Cape, Army blue
            16. 18-10. Items normally worn with the Army white uniform
            17. 18-11. General guidelines
          2. Chapter 19: Army White Uniform Female
            1. 19-1. Authorization for wear
            2. Figure 19-1. Army white uniform, female
            3. 19-2. Composition
            4. 19-3. Occasions for wear
            5. 19-4. Materials
            6. 19-5. Coat, Army white
            7. 19-6. Skirt, Army white
            8. 19-7. Shirt, white
            9. 19-8. Capes, Army blue and black
            10. 19-9. Service hat, Army white
            11. 19-10. Items normally worn with the Army white uniform
            12. 19-11. General guidelines
          3. Chapter 20: Army Blue Uniform Male
            1. 20-1. Authorization for wear
            2. 20-2. Composition
            3. Figure 20-1. Army blue uniform, officer
            4. Figure 20-2. Service cap, blue, general officers
            5. Figure 20-3. Service cap, blue, field grade officers
            6. Figure 20-4. Service cap, blue, company grade officers
            7. Figure 20-5. Service cap, blue, warrant officers
            8. Figure 20-6. Army blue uniform, enlisted
            9. Figure 20-7. Service cap, blue, enlisted
            10. 20-3. Occasions for wear
            11. 20-4. Materials
            12. 20-5. Coat, Army blue
            13. 20-6. Trousers, Army blue
            14. 20-7. Shirt, white
            15. 20-8. Service cap, Army blue
            16. 20-9. Cape, Army blue
            17. 20-10. Items normally worn with the Army blue uniform
            18. 20-11. General guidelines
          4. Chapter 21: Army Blue Uniform Female
            1. 21-1. Authorization for wear
            2. Figure 21-1. Army blue uniform, female
            3. 21-2. Composition
            4. 21-3. Occasions for wear
            5. 21-4. Materials
            6. 21-5. Coat, Army blue
            7. 21-6. Skirt, Army blue
            8. 21-7. Slacks, Army blue
            9. 21-8. Shirt, white
            10. 21-9. Capes, Army blue and black
            11. 21-10. Service hat, Army blue
            12. 21-11. Items normally worn with the Army blue uniform
            13. 21-12. General guidelines
          5. Chapter 22: Army White Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Male
            1. 22-1. Authorization for wear
            2. Figure 22-1. Army white mess uniform, general officers
            3. Figure 22-2. Army white mess uniform, other officers
            4. Figure 22-3. Army white mess uniform, enlisted
            5. 22-2. Composition
            6. 22-3. Occasions for wear
            7. 22-4. Materials
            8. 22-5. Jacket, Army white
            9. Figure 22-11. Shoulder knot
            10. Figure 22-4. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, general
            11. Figure 22-5. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, lieutenant general
            12. Figure 22-6. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, major general
            13. Figure 22-7. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, brigadier general
            14. Figure 22-8. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, field and company grade officers
            15. Figure 22-9. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, warrant officers
            16. Figure 22-10. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, enlisted
            17. 22-6. Trousers, black
            18. 22-7. Shirts, white dress
            19. 22-8. Headgear
            20. 22-9. Cape, Army blue
            21. 22-10. Cummerbund, black
            22. 22-11. Vest, white
            23. 22-12. Items normally worn with the Army white mess and evening mess uniforms
            24. 22-13. General guidelines
          6. Chapter 23: Army White Mess, All-White Mess, and Evening White Mess Uniforms Female
            1. 23-1. Authorization for wear
            2. 23-2. Composition
            3. Figure 23-1. Army white mess uniform, other officers (new version jacket)
            4. Figure 23-2. Army all-white mess uniform, enlisted (new version jacket)
            5. Figure 23-3. Army white evening mess uniform, general officer (old version jacket)
            6. 23-3. Occasions for wear
            7. 23-4. Materials
            8. 23-5. Jacket, Army white mess
            9. Figure 23-11. Shoulder knot
            10. Figure 23-4. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, general
            11. Figure 23-5. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, lieutenant general
            12. Figure 23-6. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, major general
            13. Figure 23-7. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, brigadier general
            14. Figure 23-8. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, field and company grade officers
            15. Figure 23-9. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, warrant officers
            16. Figure 23-10. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, enlisted
            17. 23-6. Skirts
            18. 23-7. Blouse, white formal
            19. 23-8. Neck tab, black, dress
            20. 23-9. Capes, Army black and blue
            21. 23-10. Cummerbunds, black and white
            22. 23-11. Headgear
            23. 23-12. Items normally worn with the Army white mess, all-white mess, and evening white mess uniforms
            24. 23-13. General guidelines
          7. Chapter 24: Army Blue Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Male
            1. 24-1. Authorization for wear
            2. 24-2. Composition
            3. Figure 24-1. Army blue mess uniform, general officers
            4. Figure 24-2. Army blue evening mess uniform, other officers
            5. Figure 24-3. Army blue mess uniform, enlisted
            6. 24-3. Occasions for wear
            7. 24-4. Materials
            8. 24-5. Jacket, Army blue mess
            9. Figure 24-11. Shoulder knot
            10. Figure 24-4. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, general
            11. Figure 24-5. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, lieutenant general
            12. Figure 24-6. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, major general
            13. Figure 24-7. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, brigadier general
            14. Figure 24-8. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, field and company grade officers
            15. Figure 24-9. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, warrant officers
            16. Figure 24-10. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, enlisted
            17. 24-6. Trousers, Army blue
            18. 24-7. Shirts, white dress
            19. 24-8. Headgear
            20. 24-9. Cape, Army blue
            21. 24-10. Cummerbund, black
            22. 24-11. Vest, white
            23. 24-12. Items normally worn with the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms
            24. 24-13. General guidelines
          8. Chapter 25: Army Blue Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Female
            1. 25-1. Authorization for wear
            2. 25-2. Composition
            3. Figure 25-1. Army blue mess uniform, general officers
            4. Figure 25-2. Army blue mess uniform, enlisted
            5. Figure 25-3. Army blue evening mess uniform, other officers
            6. 25-3. Occasions for wear
            7. 25-4. Materials
            8. 25-5. Jacket, Army blue mess
            9. Figure 25-11. Shoulder knot
            10. Figure 25-4. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, general
            11. Figure 25-5. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, lieutenant general
            12. Figure 25-6. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, major general
            13. Figure 25-7. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, brigadier general
            14. Figure 25-8. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, field and company grade officers
            15. Figure 25-9. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, warrant officers
            16. Figure 25-10. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, enlisted
            17. 25-6. Skirts
            18. 25-7. Blouse, white formal
            19. 25-8. Neck tab, black, dress
            20. 25-9. Capes, Army black and blue
            21. 25-10. Cummerbund, black
            22. 25-11. Headgear
            23. 25-12. Items normally worn with the Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms
            24. 25-13. General guidelines
          9. Chapter 26: Army Black Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Female
            1. 26-1. Authorization for wear
            2. 26-2. Composition
            3. Figure 26-1. Army black mess uniform, other officers
            4. Figure 26-2. Army black evening mess uniform, general officers
            5. 26-3. Occasions for wear
            6. 26-4. Materials
            7. 26-5. Jacket, Army black mess
            8. 26-6. Skirts
            9. 26-7. Blouse, white formal
            10. 26-8. Neck tab, black, dress
            11. 26-9. Capes, Army black and blue
            12. 26-10. Cummerbund, black
            13. 26-11. Headgear
            14. 26-12. Items normally worn with the Army black mess and black evening mess uniforms
            15. 26-13. General guidelines

Part One General Information and Responsibilities

Chapter 1: Introduction

1-1. Purpose

This regulation prescribes the authorization for wear, composition, and classification of uniforms, and the occasions for wearing all personal (clothing bag issue), optional, and commonly worn organizational Army uniforms. It also prescribes the awards, insignia, and accouterments authorized for wear on the uniform, and how these items are worn. General information is also provided on the authorized material, design, and uniform quality control system.

1-2. References

Required and related publications are listed in appendix A.

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

1-4. General

  1. Only uniforms, accessories, and insignia prescribed in this regulation or in the common tables of allowance (CTA), or as approved by Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA), will be worn by personnel in the U.S. Army. Unless specified in this regulation, the commander issuing the clothing and equipment will establish wear policies for organizational clothing and equipment. No item governed by this regulation will be altered in any way that changes the basic design or the intended concept of fit as described in TM 10-227 and AR 700-84, including plating, smoothing, or removing detail features of metal items, or otherwise altering the color or appearance. All illustrations in this regulation should coincide with the text. The written description will control any inconsistencies between the text and the illustration.
  2. AR 70-1 prescribes Department of the Army (DA) policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures by which all clothing and individual equipment used by Army personnel are initiated, designed, developed, tested, approved, fielded, and modified.
  3. AR 385-10 prescribes DA policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures and funding for protective clothing and equipment.
  4. In accordance with chapter 45, section 771, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 771), no person except a member of the U.S. Army may wear the uniform, or a distinctive part of the uniform of the U.S. Army unless otherwise authorized by law. Additionally, no person except a member of the U.S. Army may wear a uniform, any part of which is similar to a distinctive part of the U.S. Army uniform. This includes the distinctive uniforms and uniform items listed in paragraph 1-12 of this regulation. Further, soldiers are not authorized to wear distinctive uniforms or uniform items of the U.S. Army or of other U.S. Services with, or on civilian clothes, except as provided in chapters 27 through 30 of this regulation.

1-5. How to recommend changes to Army uniforms

  1. If a major Army command (MACOM) recommends approval of an AIEP suggestion, the recommendation will be forwarded to the Project Manager-Soldier Systems (SEQ), Bldg. 328, 5901 Putnam Road, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5852, for consideration. Each suggestion forwarded to the project manager will reflect the MACOM position; contain all appropriate supporting documentation; and be signed by the commander, deputy commander, chief of staff, or comparable level official. Suggestions not recommended for adoption at any level will not be forwarded to PM-Soldier. Suggestions forwarded without a MACOM position will be returned to the MACOM for action.
  2. Comments and suggestions regarding the policy, criteria, and administrative instructions concerning individual military decorations, the Good Conduct Medal, service medals and service ribbons, combat and special skill badges and tabs, and unit decorations will be processed in accordance with AR 600-8-22.

1-6. Classification of service and utility or field uniforms

  1. The male class A service uniform consists of the Army green (AG) coat and trousers, a short- or long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt with a black four-in-hand tie, and other authorized accessories.
  2. The male class B service uniform is the same as class A, except the service coat is not worn. The black four-in-hand tie is required with the long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt when the long-sleeved shirt is worn without the class A coat, as an outer garment; the tie is optional with the short-sleeved shirt.
  3. The female class A service uniform consists of the Army green coat and skirt or slacks, a short- or long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt with a black neck tab, and other authorized accessories. The Army green maternity uniform (slacks or skirt) is also classified as a class A service uniform when the tunic is worn. When the tunic is worn, females will wear the neck tab with both the short- and long-sleeved maternity shirts.
  4. The female class B service uniform is the same as the class A, except that neither the service coat nor the maternity tunic are worn. The black neck tab is required only when wearing the long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt or the long-sleeved maternity shirt without the class A coat or tunic; the neck tab is optional with the short-sleeved version of both shirts.
  5. Class C uniforms are the utility, field, hospital duty, food service, and other organizational uniforms.
  6. See the table of prescribed dress in appendix B.

1-7. Personal appearance policies

  1. General. The Army is a uniformed service where discipline is judged, in part, by the manner in which a soldier wears a prescribed uniform, as well as by the individual’s personal appearance. Therefore, a neat and well-groomed appearance by all soldiers is fundamental to the Army and contributes to building the pride and esprit essential to an effective military force. A vital ingredient of the Army’s strength and military effectiveness is the pride and self-discipline that American soldiers bring to their Service through a conservative military image. It is the responsibility of commanders to ensure that military personnel under their command present a neat and soldierly appearance. Therefore, in the absence of specific procedures or guidelines, commanders must determine a soldier’s compliance with standards in this regulation. Soldiers must take pride in their appearance at all times, in or out of uniform, on and off duty. Pride in appearance includes soldiers’ physical fitness and adherence to acceptable weight standards, in accordance with AR 600-9.
  2. Exceptions to appearance standards based on religious practices.
    1. As provided by AR 600-20, paragraph 5-6, and subject to temporary revocation because of health, safety, or mission requirements, the following applies to the wear of religious apparel, articles, or jewelry. The term “religious apparel” is defined as articles of clothing worn as part of the observance of the religious faith practiced by the soldier. Religious articles include, but are not limited to, medallions, small booklets, pictures, or copies of religious symbols or writing carried by the individual in wallets or pockets. Except as noted below, personnel may not wear religious items if they do not meet the standards of this regulation, and requests for accommodation will not be entertained (see AR 600-20, para 5-6(2)(d)).
  3. Soldiers may wear religious apparel, articles, or jewelry with the uniform, to include the physical fitness uniform, if they are neat, conservative, and discreet. “Neat conservative, and discreet” is defined as meeting the uniform criteria of this regulation. In other words, when religious jewelry is worn, the uniform must meet the same standards of wear as if the religious jewelry were not worn. For example, a religious item worn on a chain may not be visible when worn with the utility, service, dress, or mess uniforms. When worn with the physical fitness uniform, the item should be no more visible than identification (ID) tags would be in the same uniform. The width of chains worn with religious items should be approximately the same size as the width of the ID tag chain.
  4. Soldiers may not wear these items when doing so would interfere with the performance of their duties or present a safety concern. Soldiers may not be prohibited, however, from wearing religious apparel, articles, or jewelry meeting the criteria of this regulation simply because they are religious in nature, if wear is permitted of similar items of a nonreligious nature. A specific example would be wearing a ring with a religious symbol. If the ring meets the uniform standards for jewelry and is not worn in a work area where rings are prohibited because of safety concerns, then wear is allowed and may not be prohibited simply because the ring bears a religious symbol.
  5. During a worship service, rite, or ritual, soldiers may wear visible or apparent religious articles, symbols, jewelry, and apparel that do not meet normal uniform standards. Commanders, however, may place reasonable limits on the wear of non-subdued items of religious apparel during worship services, rites, or rituals conducted in the field for operational or safety reasons. When soldiers in uniform wear visible religious articles on such occasions, they must ensure that these articles are not permanently affixed or appended to any prescribed article of the uniform.
  6. Chaplains may wear religious attire as described in this regulation, CTA 50-909, and AR 165-1 in the performance of religious services and other official duties, as required. Commanders may not prohibit chaplains from wearing religious symbols that are part of the chaplain’s duty uniform. (See AR 600-20, para 5-6(7).)
  7. Soldiers may wear religious headgear while in uniform if the headgear meets the following criteria.
    1. It must be subdued in color (black, brown, green, dark or navy blue, or a combination of these colors).
    2. It must be of a style and size that can be completely covered by standard military headgear, and it cannot interfere with the proper wear or functioning of protective clothing or equipment.
    3. The headgear cannot bear any writing, symbols, or pictures.
    4. Personnel will not wear religious headgear in place of military headgear when military headgear is required (outdoors, or indoors when required for duties or ceremonies).
  8. Personal grooming. Hair and grooming practices are governed by paragraph 1-8 of this regulation, and exceptions or accommodations based on religious practices will not be granted. As an exception, policy exceptions based on religious practice given to soldiers in accordance with AR 600-20 on or prior to 1 January 1986 remain in effect as long as the soldier remains otherwise qualified for retention.

1-8. Hair and fingernail standards and grooming policies

  1. Hair.
    1. General. The requirement for hair grooming standards is necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population. Many hairstyles are acceptable, as long as they are neat and conservative. It is not possible to address every acceptable hairstyle, or what constitutes eccentric or conservative grooming. Therefore, it is the responsibility of leaders at all levels to exercise good judgment in the enforcement of Army policy. All soldiers will comply with the hair, fingernail, and grooming policies while in any military uniform or while in civilian clothes on duty.
  2. Leaders will judge the appropriateness of a particular hairstyle by the appearance of headgear when worn. Soldiers will wear headgear as described in the applicable chapters of this regulation. Headgear will fit snugly and comfortably, without distortion or excessive gaps. Hairstyles that do not allow soldiers to wear the headgear properly, or that interfere with the proper wear of the protective mask or other protective equipment, are prohibited.
  3. Extreme, eccentric, or trendy haircuts or hairstyles are not authorized. If soldiers use dyes, tints, or bleaches, they must choose those that result in natural hair colors. Colors that detract from a professional military appearance are prohibited. Therefore, soldiers should avoid using colors that result in an extreme appearance. Applied hair colors that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, purple, blue, pink, green, orange, bright (fire-engine) red, and fluorescent or neon colors. It is the responsibility of leaders to use good judgment in determining if applied colors are acceptable, based upon the overall effect on soldiers’ appearance.
  4. Soldiers who have a texture of hair that does not part naturally may cut a part into the hair. The part will be one straight line, not slanted or curved, and will fall in the area where the soldier would normally part the hair. Soldiers will not cut designs into their hair or scalp.
  5. Male haircuts will conform to the following standards.
    1. The hair on top of the head must be neatly groomed. The length and bulk of the hair may not be excessive or present a ragged, unkempt, or extreme appearance. The hair must present a tapered appearance. A tapered appearance is one where the outline of the soldier’s hair conforms to the shape of the head, curving inward to the natural termination point at the base of the neck. When the hair is combed, it will not fall over the ears or eyebrows, or touch the collar, except for the closely cut hair at the back of the neck. The block-cut fullness in the back is permitted to a moderate degree, as long as the tapered look is maintained. In all cases, the bulk or length of hair may not interfere with the normal wear of headgear (see para 1-8(1)(a), above) or protective masks or equipment. Males are not authorized to wear braids, cornrows, or dreadlocks (unkempt, twisted, matted, individual parts of hair) while in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty. Hair that is clipped closely or shaved to the scalp is authorized.
    2. Males will keep sideburns neatly trimmed. Sideburns may not be flared; the base of the sideburn will be a clean-shaven, horizontal line. Sideburns will not extend below the lowest part of the exterior ear opening.
    3. Males will keep their face clean-shaven when in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty. Mustaches are permitted; if worn, males will keep mustaches neatly trimmed, tapered, and tidy. Mustaches will not present a chopped off or bushy appearance, and no portion of the mustache will cover the upper lip line or extend sideways beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth (see figure 1-1). Handlebar mustaches, goatees, and beards are not authorized. If appropriate medical authority prescribes beard growth, the length required for medical treatment must be specified. For example, “The length of the beard will not exceed inch” (see TB MED 287). Soldiers will keep the growth trimmed to the level specified by appropriate medical authority, but they are not authorized to shape the growth into goatees, or “Fu Manchu” or handlebar mustaches.
    4. Males are prohibited from wearing wigs or hairpieces while in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty, except to cover natural baldness or physical disfiguration caused by accident or medical procedure. When worn, wigs or hairpieces will conform to the standard haircut criteria as stated in 1-8a(2)(a), above.

Figure 1-1. Wear of mustache

  1. Female haircuts will conform to the following standards.
    1. Females will ensure their hair is neatly groomed, that the length and bulk of the hair are not excessive, and that the hair does not present a ragged, unkempt, or extreme appearance. Likewise, trendy styles that result in shaved portions of the scalp (other than the neckline) or designs cut into the hair are prohibited. Females may wear braids and cornrows as long as the braided style is conservative, the braids and cornrows lie snugly on the head, and any hair-holding devices comply with the standards in 1-8a(3)(d) below. Dreadlocks (unkempt, twisted, matted individual parts of hair) are prohibited in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty. Hair will not fall over the eyebrows or extend below the bottom edge of the collar at any time during normal activity or when standing in formation. Long hair that falls naturally below the bottom edge of the collar, to include braids, will be neatly and inconspicuously fastened or pinned, so no free-hanging hair is visible. This includes styles worn with the physical fitness uniform/improved physical fitness uniform (PFU/IPFU).
    2. Styles that are lopsided or distinctly unbalanced are prohibited. Ponytails, pigtails, or braids that are not secured to the head (allowing hair to hang freely), widely spaced individual hanging locks, and other extreme styles that protrude from the head are prohibited. Extensions, weaves, wigs, and hairpieces are authorized; however, these additions must have the same general appearance as the individual’s natural hair. Additionally, any wigs, extensions, hairpieces, or weaves must comply with the grooming policies set forth in this paragraph.
    3. Females will ensure that hairstyles do not interfere with proper wear of military headgear and protective masks or equipment at any time (see 1-8a(1)(a), above). When headgear is worn, the hair will not extend below the bottom edge of the front of the headgear, nor will it extend below the bottom edge of the collar.
    4. Hair-holding devices are authorized only for the purpose of securing the hair. Soldiers will not place hair-holding devices in the hair for decorative purposes. All hair-holding devices must be plain and of a color as close to the soldier’s hair as is possible or clear. Authorized devices include, but are not limited to, small, plain scrunchies (elastic hair bands covered with material), barrettes, combs, pins, clips, rubber bands, and hair bands. Devices that are conspicuous, excessive, or decorative are prohibited. Some examples of prohibited devices include, but are not limited to, large, lacy scrunchies; beads, bows, or claw clips; clips, pins, or barrettes with butterflies, flowers, sparkles, gems, or scalloped edges; and bows made from hairpieces.
    5. Soldiers may not wear hairnets unless they are required for health or safety reasons, or in the performance of duties (such as those of a cook). No other type of hair covering is authorized in lieu of the hairnet. The commander will provide the hairnet to the soldier at no cost.
  2. Cosmetics.
    1. General. As with hairstyles, the requirement for standards regarding cosmetics is necessary to maintain uniformity and to avoid an extreme or unmilitary appearance. Males are prohibited from wearing cosmetics, to include nail polish. Females are authorized to wear cosmetics with all uniforms, provided they are applied conservatively and in good taste and complement the uniform. Leaders at all levels must exercise good judgment in the enforcement of this policy.
  3. Females may wear cosmetics if they are conservative and complement the uniform and their complexion. Eccentric, exaggerated, or trendy cosmetic styles and colors, to include makeup designed to cover tattoos, are inappropriate with the uniform and are prohibited. Permanent makeup, such as eyebrow or eyeliner, is authorized as long as the makeup conforms to the standards outlined above.
  4. Females will not wear shades of lipstick and nail polish that distinctly contrast with their complexion, that detract from the uniform, or that are extreme. Some examples of extreme colors include, but are not limited to, purple, gold, blue, black, white, bright (fire-engine) red, khaki, camouflage colors, and fluorescent colors. Soldiers will not apply designs to nails or apply two-tone or multi-tone colors to nails.
  5. Females will comply with the cosmetics policy while in any military uniform or while in civilian clothes on duty.
  6. Fingernails. All personnel will keep fingernails clean and neatly trimmed. Males will keep nails trimmed so as not to extend beyond the fingertip. Females will not exceed a nail length of inch, as measured from the tip of the finger. Females will trim nails shorter if the commander determines that the longer length detracts from the military image, presents a safety concern, or interferes with the performance of duties.
  7. Hygiene and body grooming. Soldiers will maintain good personal hygiene and grooming on a daily basis and wear the uniform so as not to detract from their overall military appearance.
  8. Tattoo policy
    1. Tattoos or brands anywhere on the head, face, and neck above the class A uniform collar are prohibited.
    2. Tattoos or brands that are extremist, indecent, sexist, or racist are prohibited, regardless of location on the body, as they are prejudicial to good order and discipline within units.
  9. Extremist tattoos or brands are those affiliated with, depicting, or symbolizing extremist philosophies, organizations, or activities. Extremist philosophies, organizations, and activities are those which advocate racial, gender or ethnic hatred or intolerance; advocate, create, or engage in illegal discrimination based on race, color, gender, ethnicity, religion, or national origin; or advocate violence or other unlawful means of depriving individual rights under the U.S. Constitution, Federal, or State law (see para 4-12, AR 600-20).
  10. Indecent tattoos or brands are those that are grossly offensive to modesty, decency, or propriety; shock the moral sense because of their vulgar, filthy, or disgusting nature or tendency to incite lustful thought; or tend reasonably to corrupt morals or incite libidinous thoughts.
  11. Sexist tattoos or brands are those that advocate a philosophy that degrades or demeans a person based on gender, but that may not meet the same definition of “indecent.”
  12. Racist tattoos or brands are those that advocate a philosophy that degrades or demeans a person based on race, ethnicity, or national origin.
  13. Counseling requirements.
    1. Commanders will ensure soldiers understand the tattoo policy.
    2. For soldiers who are not in compliance, commanders may not order the removal of a tattoo or brand. However, the commander must counsel soldiers, and afford them the opportunity to seek medical advice about removal or alteration of the tattoo or brand.
  14. If soldiers are not in compliance with the policy, and refuse to remove or alter the tattoos or brands, commanders will:
    1. Ensure the soldier understands the policy.
    2. Ensure the soldier has been afforded the opportunity to seek medical advice about removal or alteration.
    3. Counsel the soldier in writing. The counseling form will state that the soldier’s refusal to remove extremist, indecent, sexist, or racist tattoos or brands anywhere on the body, or refusal to remove any type of tattoo or brand visible in the class A uniform (worn with slacks/trousers), will result in discharge.
  15. Existing tattoos or brands on the hands that are not extremist, indecent, sexist, or racist, but are visible in the class A uniform (worn with slacks/trousers), are authorized.
  16. Finality of determination.
    1. Recruiting battalion commanders or recruiting battalion executive officers (0-5 or above) will make initial entry determinations that tattoos or brands comply with this policy for Active Army and Army Reserve soldiers. This authority will not be delegated further.
    2. Unit commanders or unit executive officers will make determinations for soldiers currently on active duty. This authority will not be delegated further.
    3. Recruiting and retention managers (O-5 or above) will make initial entry determinations that tattoos or brands comply with this policy for National Guard soldiers. This authority will not be delegated further.
    4. Professors of military science (O-5 or above) will make initial entry determinations that tattoos or brands comply with this policy for ROTC cadets. This authority will not be delegated further.
    5. The Director of Admissions will make initial entry determinations that tattoos or brands comply with this policy for the U.S. Military Academy cadets. This authority will not be delegated further.
    6. Determinations will be fully documented in writing and will include a description of existing tattoos or brands and their location on the body. A copy of the determination will be provided to the soldier. Unless otherwise directed by the Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, these determinations are final. If a tattoo or brand is discovered to violate this policy after an initial determination has been documented, commanders must submit requests for an exception to policy or for discharge through the soldier’s chain of command to the MACOM for approval. Appeals to the MACOM decision will be forwarded to the Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1 for decision.
  17. Soldiers may not cover tattoos or brands in order to comply with the tattoo policy.

1-9. Uniform appearance and fit

  1. Appearance.
    1. All personnel will maintain a high standard of dress and appearance. Uniforms will fit properly; trousers, pants, or skirts should not fit tightly; and personnel must keep uniforms clean and serviceable and press them as necessary. Soldiers must project a military image that leaves no doubt that they live by a common military standard and are responsible to military order and discipline. Soldiers will ensure that articles carried in pockets do not protrude from the pocket or present a bulky appearance.
    2. Wear of items on uniforms.
  2. When required and prescribed by the commander, soldiers may attach keys or key chains to the uniform when performing duties such as charge of quarters, armorer, duty officer/NCO, or other duties as prescribed by the commander. Keys or key chains will be attached to the uniform on the belt, belt loops, or waistband.
  3. At the discretion of the commander, and when required in the performance of duties listed above, soldiers may wear an electronic device on the belt, belt loops, or waistband of the uniform. Only one electronic device may be worn; it may be either a pager or a cell phone. The body of the device may not exceed 4x2x1 inches, and the device and carrying case must be black; no other colors are authorized. If security cords or chains are attached to the device, soldiers will conceal the cord or chain from view. Other types of electronic devices are not authorized for wear on the uniform. If the commander issues and requires the use of other electronic devices in the performance of duties, the soldier will carry them in the hand, pocket, briefcase, purse, bag, or in some other carrying container.
  4. Soldiers will not wear keys, key chains, or electronic devices on the uniform when the commander determines such wear is inappropriate, such as in formation, or during parades or ceremonies. Soldiers will not wear items or devices on the uniform when not performing required duties.
  5. While in uniform, personnel will not place their hands in their pockets, except momentarily to place or retrieve objects. Soldiers will keep uniforms buttoned, zipped, and snapped. They will ensure metallic devices such as metal insignia, belt buckles, and belt tips are free of scratches and corrosion and are in proper luster or remain properly subdued, as applicable; and that all medals and ribbons are clean and not frayed. Personnel will keep shoes and boots cleaned and shined. Soldiers will replace the insignia listed in AR 700-84, paragraph 5-5, when it becomes unserviceable or no longer conforms to standards.
  6. Lapels and sleeves of service, dress, and mess coats and jackets will be roll-pressed, without creasing. Skirts will not be creased. Trousers, slacks, and the sleeves of shirts and blouses will be creased. Soldiers may add military creases to the AG shade 415 shirt and the BDU coat (not the field jacket). Personnel will center the front creases on each side of the shirt, centered on the pockets, for those garments that have front pockets. Soldiers may press a horizontal crease across the upper back of the shirt or coat (not necessary on the male shirt due to the yoke seam), and they may press three equally spaced vertical creases down the back, beginning at the yoke seam or the horizontal crease. Additionally, personnel may crease the sleeves of the battle dress uniform (BDU) coat. Personnel are not authorized to sew military creases into the uniform.
  7. Although some uniform items are made of wash-and-wear materials or are treated with a permanent-press finish, soldiers may need to press these items to maintain a neat, military appearance. However, before pressing uniform items, soldiers should read and comply with care instruction labels attached to the items. Soldiers may starch BDUs and the maternity work uniform, at their option. Commanders will not require soldiers to starch these uniforms, and soldiers will not receive an increase in their clothing replacement allowance to compensate for potential premature wear that may be caused by starching uniforms.
  8. Fit. Fitting instructions and alterations of uniforms will be made in accordance with AR 700-84 and TM 10-227. The following is a summary of general fitting guidelines.
    1. Black all-weather coat.
  9. Males. The length of the sleeves of the all-weather coat will be inch longer than the service coat. The bottom of the black all weather coat will reach to a point 1 inches below the center of the knee.
  10. Females. The length of the sleeves of the all-weather coat will be inch longer than the service coat. The bottom of the coat will reach a point at least 1 inch below the skirt hem, but not less than 1 inches below the center of the knee.
  11. Uniform coats and jackets (male and female). The sleeve length will be 1 inch below the bottom of the wrist bone.
  12. Trousers and slacks.
    1. Trousers will be fitted and worn with the lower edge of the waistband at the top of the hipbone, plus or minus inch. The front crease of the trousers will reach the top of the instep, touching the top of the shoe at the shoelaces. Trousers will be cut on a diagonal line to reach a point approximately midway between the top of the heel and the top of the standard shoe in the back. The trousers may have a slight break in the front.
    2. Slacks will be fitted and worn so that the center of the waistband is at the natural waistline. The front crease of the slacks will reach the top of the instep, touching the top of the foot or the shoe at the shoelaces. Slacks will be cut on a diagonal line to reach a point approximately midway between the top of the heel and the top of the standard shoe in the back. The slacks may have a slight break in the front.
  13. Knee-length skirts. Skirt lengths will be no more than 1 inch above or 2 inches below the center of the knee.
  14. Long-sleeved shirts. The sleeve length will extend to the center of the wrist bone.
  15. Other. Personnel will wear appropriate undergarments with all uniforms, in accordance with paragraph 27-28.

1-10. When the wear of the Army uniform is required or prohibited

  1. All personnel will wear the Army uniform when on duty, unless granted an exception by the commander to wear civilian clothes. The wear of civilian clothing on duty is subject to the provisions of AR 700-84. The following personnel may grant exceptions:
    1. Commanders of major commands.
    2. Assistant Secretaries, the Secretary of Defense or his designee, or the Secretary of the Army.
    3. Heads of Department of Defense agencies.
    4. Heads of Department of the Army Staff agencies.
  2. Personnel traveling on Air Mobility Command and non-Air Mobility Comand flights on permanent change of station (PCS) orders, temporary duty (TDY), emergency leave, or space-available flights, are authorized to wear civilian clothes. Personnel must ensure clothing worn is appropriate for the occasion and reflects positively on the Army. (See DOD 4500.54-G) for information concerning mandatory wear of civilian clothing in foreign countries. The individual’s travel orders will reflect information authorizing the wear of civilian clothing.)
  3. Soldiers may wear the BDU when deploying as part of a unit move and the mode of transportation is for the exclusive use of the military. Embarkation and debarkation points will be in military-controlled areas.
  4. Soldiers may wear optional uniform items with the class A and B service uniforms, as prescribed in this regulation. All uniform combinations are authorized for year-round wear. However, soldiers should use appropriate discretion based upon weather conditions and duties. Wearing combinations of uniform items not prescribed in this regulation or in other authorization documents approved by HQDA, is prohibited. Commanders will not prescribe seasonal wear dates for uniform items.
  5. Wear of military and civilian items.
    1. The wear of a combination of civilian and military clothing is prohibited, unless prescribed in this regulation or other authorization documents approved by HQDA.
    2. Soldiers may carry civilian gym bags, civilian rucksacks, or other similar civilian bags while in uniform. Soldiers may carry these bags by hand, on one shoulder using a shoulder strap, or over both shoulders using both shoulder straps. If the soldier opts to carry a bag over one shoulder, the bag must be carried on the same side of the body as the shoulder strap; therefore, soldiers may not carry the bag slung across the body with the strap over the opposite shoulder. If soldiers choose to carry a shoulder bag while in uniform, the bag must be black with no other colors and may not have any logos. The contents of the bag may not be visible; therefore, see-through plastic or mesh bags are not authorized. There is no restriction on the color of civilian bags carried in the hand. These rules do not apply to purses, which are covered in chapter 27 of this regulation. Commanders govern the wear of organizational issue rucksacks in garrison and field environments.
  6. Soldiers may continue to wear uniform items changed in design or material as long as the item remains in serviceable condition, unless specifically prohibited. (See appendix D for a list of possession and wear-out dates for uniform items.)
  7. Civilian clothing is considered appropriate attire for individuals who are participating in civilian outdoor activities such as volksmarches, orienteering, or similar activities. Soldiers who are spectators at these activities may wear the service uniform. Soldiers who are participating in, or observing these events are not authorized to wear utility or field uniforms. However, commanders of participating units or of those units that provide support personnel, such as medical and traffic control personnel, may prescribe appropriate uniforms, to include utility or organizational uniforms, if warranted by the occasion, weather conditions, or activity.
  8. Soldiers may wear experimental uniform items while actively engaged in an experimental uniform test program approved by HQ, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, HQ, Army Materiel Command (AMC), or the Army Uniform Board, HQDA. Soldiers will not wear experimental items after completion of the test unless such wear is approved by HQDA.
  9. Army National Guard technicians who are also members of the Army National Guard will wear the appropriate Army duty uniform while engaged in their civil service status.
  10. Wearing Army uniforms is prohibited in the following situations:
    1. In connection with the furtherance of any political or commercial interests, or when engaged in off-duty civilian employment.
    2. When participating in public speeches, interviews, picket lines, marches, rallies, or public demonstrations, except as authorized by competent authority.
    3. When attending any meeting or event that is a function of, or is sponsored by, an extremist organization.
    4. When wearing the uniform would bring discredit upon the Army.
    5. When specifically prohibited by Army regulations.
  11. Soldiers will wear headgear with the Army uniform, except under the following circumstances:
    1. Headgear is not required if it would interfere with the safe operation of military vehicles. The wear of military headgear is not required while in or on a privately owned vehicle (to include a motorcycle, bicycle, or convertible automobile), a commercial vehicle, or on public conveyance (such as a subway, train, plane, or bus).
    2. Soldiers will not wear headgear indoors unless under arms in an official capacity, or when directed by the commander, such as for indoor ceremonial activities.
    3. Male and female soldiers are not required to wear headgear to evening social events (after Retreat) when wearing the Army blue and white uniforms, the enlisted green dress uniform, the Army green maternity dress uniform (females only), or the mess and evening mess uniforms.
    4. Soldiers will carry their headgear, when it is not worn, in their hands while wearing service, dress, and mess uniforms. Soldiers are authorized storage of the headgear, when it is not worn, in the BDU cargo pockets. Soldiers must fold the headgear neatly so as not to present a bulky appearance. Soldiers will not attach headgear to the uniform or hang it from the belt.

1-11. Uniformity of material

  1. When soldiers exercise their option to choose among various fabrics authorized for uniforms, they must ensure that all garments (coats, trousers, skirts, and slacks) are made of the same material. However, junior and senior ROTC cadets may wear garrison caps made of polyester-wool blend (AG shade 489) or all polyester (AG shade 491) interchangeably with service uniforms of either shade.
  2. When gold lace (sleeve or trouser ornamentation) or gold bullion is prescribed for wear with uniforms, personnel may substitute gold-colored nylon, rayon, or synthetic metallic gold. If trouser and sleeve ornamentation is gold bullion, the cap ornamentation and shoulder strap insignia must also be gold bullion.
  3. Ornamentation on the visors of all service caps will be gold bullion or synthetic metallic gold yarn, or anodized aluminum in 24- karat yellow-gold color.
  4. Anodized aluminum white-gold colored buttons are not authorized for wear.

1-12. Distinctive uniforms and uniform items

  1. The following uniform items are distinctive and will not be sold to or worn by unauthorized personnel:
    1. All Army headgear, when worn with insignia.
    2. Badges and tabs (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill).
    3. Uniform buttons (U.S. Army or Corps of Engineers).
    4. Decorations, service medals, service and training ribbons, and other awards and their appurtenances.
    5. Insignia of any design or color that the Army has adopted.
  2. Individuals will remove all distinctive items before disposing of unserviceable uniform items.

1-13. Wear of civilian clothing

  1. Civilian clothing is authorized for wear when off duty, unless the wear is prohibited by the installation commander in CONUS or by the MACOM commander overseas. Commanders down to unit level may restrict the wear of civilian clothes by those soldiers who have had their pass privileges revoked, under the provisions of AR 600-8-10.
  2. When on duty in civilian clothes, Army personnel will conform to the appearance standards in this regulation, unless specifically exempted by the commander for specific mission requirements.

1-14. Wear of jewelry

  1. Soldiers may wear a wristwatch, a wrist identification bracelet, and a total of two rings (a wedding set is considered one ring) with Army uniforms, unless prohibited by the commander for safety or health reasons. Any jewelry soldiers wear must be conservative and in good taste. Identification bracelets are limited to medical alert bracelets and MIA/POW identification bracelets. Soldiers may wear only one item on each wrist.
  2. No jewelry, other than that described in paragraph 1-14, above, will appear exposed while wearing the uniform; this includes watch chains, or similar items, and pens and pencils. The only authorized exceptions are religious items described in para 1-7, above; a conservative tie tack or tie clasp that male soldiers may wear with the black four-in-hand necktie; and a pen or pencil that may appear exposed on the hospital duty, food service, CVC, or flight uniforms.
  3. Body piercing. When on any Army installation or other places under Army control, soldiers may not attach, affix, or display objects, articles, jewelry, or ornamentation to or through the skin while they are in uniform, in civilian clothes on duty, or in civilian clothes off duty (this includes earrings for male soldiers). The only exception is for female soldiers, as indicated in paragraph 1-14, below. (The term “skin” is not confined to external skin, but includes the tongue, lips, inside the mouth, and other surfaces of the body not readily visible).
  4. Females are authorized to wear prescribed earrings with the service, dress, and mess uniforms.
    1. Earrings may be screw-on, clip-on, or post-type earrings, in gold, silver, white pearl, or diamond. The earrings will not exceed 6 mm or inch in diameter, and they must be unadorned and spherical. When worn, the earrings will fit snugly against the ear. Females may wear earrings only as a matched pair, with only one earring per ear lobe.
    2. Females are not authorized to wear earrings with any class C (utility) uniform (BDU, hospital duty, food service, physical fitness, field, or organizational).
    3. When on duty in civilian attire, female soldiers must comply with the specifications listed in (1) above when wearing earrings, unless otherwise authorized by the commander. When females are off duty, there are no restrictions on the wear of earrings.
  5. Ankle bracelets, necklaces (other than those described in para 1-7), faddish (trendy) devices, medallions, amulets, and personal talismans or icons are not authorized for wear in any military uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty.

1-15. Wear of eyeglasses, sunglasses, and contact lenses

  1. Wear of eyeglasses and sunglasses.
    1. Conservative civilian prescription eyeglasses are authorized for wear with all uniforms.
    2. Conservative prescription and nonprescription sunglasses are authorized for wear when in a garrison environment, except when in formation and while indoors. Individuals who are required by medical authority to wear sunglasses for medical reasons other than refractive error may wear them, except when health or safety considerations apply. Soldiers may not wear sunglasses in the field, unless required by the commander for safety reasons in high-glare, field environments.
    3. Restrictions on eyeglasses and sunglasses. Eyeglasses or sunglasses that are trendy, or have lenses or frames with initials, designs, or other adornments are not authorized for wear. Soldiers may not wear lenses with extreme or trendy colors, which include but are not limited to, red, yellow, blue, purple, bright green, or orange. Lens colors must be traditional gray, brown, or dark green shades. Personnel will not wear lenses or frames that are so large or so small that they detract from the appearance of the uniform. Personnel will not attach chains, bands, or ribbons to eyeglasses. Eyeglass restraints are authorized only when required for safety purposes. Personnel will not hang eyeglasses or eyeglass cases on the uniform, and may not let glasses hang from eyeglass restraints down the front of the uniform.
  2. Restrictions on contact lenses. Tinted or colored contact lenses are not authorized for wear with the uniform. The only exception is for opaque lenses that are prescribed medically for eye injuries. Additionally, clear lenses that have designs on them that change the contour of the iris are not authorized for wear with the uniform.

1-16. Wear of identification tags and security badges

  1. Identification (ID) tags. The wear of ID tags is governed by AR 600-8-14.
    1. Soldiers will wear ID tags at all times when in a field environment, while traveling in aircraft, and when outside the continental United States.
    2. Personnel will wear ID tags around the neck, except when safety considerations apply (such as during physical training).
  2. Security identification badges. In restricted areas, commanders may prescribe the wear of security identification badges, in accordance with AR 600-8-14 and other applicable regulations. Personnel will not wear security identification badges outside the area for which they are required. Personnel will not hang other items from the security badge(s). The manner of wear will be determined by the organization that requires wear of the badges.

1-17. Wear of personal protective or reflective clothing

  1. Protective headgear. Soldiers are authorized to wear commercially designed, protective headgear with the uniform when operating motorcycles, bicycles, or other like vehicles, and are required to do so when installation regulations mandate such wear. Personnel will remove protective headgear and don authorized Army headgear upon dismounting from the vehicle.
  2. Protective/reflective clothing. Soldiers may wear protective/reflective outer garments with uniforms when safety considerations make it appropriate and when authorized by the commander.

1-18. Wear of organizational protective or reflective clothing

When safety considerations apply, commanders may require the wear of organizational protective or reflective items, or other occupational health or safety equipment, with the uniform (such as during physical fitness training). If required, commanders will furnish protective or reflective clothing to soldiers at no cost.

1-19. Restrictions on the purchase, possession, and reproduction of heraldic items

  1. The heraldic items listed below are authorized for purchase and possession. Variations from the prescribed specifications for these heraldic items are not permitted without the prior approval of The Institute of Heraldry (TIOH), U.S. Army.
    1. All insignia approved by HQDA.
    2. Appurtenances and devices for attachment to decorations, service medals, and ribbons.
    3. Miniature replicas of decorations, service medals, and ribbons.
    4. Oversize replicas of decorations and service medals for grave markers only. These replicas must be at least twice the size prescribed for the decoration or service medal.
    5. Ribbons pertaining to decorations and service medals.
    6. Unit award emblems, fourrageres, and the orange lanyard.
    7. Combat, special skill, and marksmanship badges, including miniatures and dress miniatures.
    8. Identification badges.
    9. Rosettes and lapel buttons.
  2. The heraldic items listed below are not authorized for purchase.
    1. Medal of Honor.
    2. Items incorporating designs or the likeness of decorations, service medals, and service ribbons.
  3. Possession, wear, and other uses of heraldic items.
    1. The possession of any of the items listed in paragraph 1-19, above, or elsewhere in this regulation is authorized. The wear of any HQDA-prescribed decoration, service medal, badge, service ribbon, lapel button, or insignia by persons not authorized to do so, or their use of such items to defraud or to misrepresent their identification or status, is prohibited. Persons violating this provision are subject to punishment under the statutes listed in sections 701 and 704, title 18, U.S. Code (18 USC 701, 704).
    2. No organization, society, or other group of persons may use any of the articles or imitations specified in paragraph 1-19, above, or elsewhere in this regulation without written approval of the Secretary of the Army.
  4. Reproductions of heraldic items.
    1. The heraldic items listed in paragraph 1-19, above, may not be reproduced, except as prescribed in AR 672-8.
    2. Certain designs, the likeness of insignia, and specified badges, such as combat, special skill, and marksmanship, may be incorporated in articles manufactured for sale, provided The Institute of Heraldry has granted permission in writing.

Chapter 2: Responsibilities

2-1. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

  1. Consistent with controlling law and regulation, the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1 (DCS, G-1) has the authority to approve exceptions to this regulation. The DCS, G-1 may delegate this authority in writing to a division chief within the proponent agency who holds the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. The approval authority will coordinate all questions regarding the scope of authority to approve exceptions with HQDA, OTJAG, ATTN: DAJA-AL, Washington, DC 20310-2200.
  2. The DCS, G-1 will develop and monitor the following Army policies:
    1. Standards of personal appearance.
    2. The standards for the wear of utility, service, dress, and mess uniforms and for the accessories, awards and decorations, accouterments, insignia, and other heraldic items worn with all authorized uniforms.
  3. The DCS, G-1 will do the following:
    1. Function as a member of the Army Uniform Board
    2. Coordinate with the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) and the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, as required in order to incorporate uniform changes or additions to this regulation.

2-2. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4

  1. The Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4 (DCS, G-4) is responsible for the life-cycle management of clothing and individual equipment, in accordance with AR 70-1.
  2. The DCS, G-4 coordinates the Army Uniform Board meetings.

2-3. The Institute of Heraldry

The Institute of Heraldry (TIOH) will do the following:

  1. Monitor the Heraldic Quality Control System in accordance with AR 672-8, to ensure heraldic items are manufactured according to government specifications or purchase descriptions.
  2. Provide manufacturers with government-loaned tools and specifications for heraldic items.
  3. Authorize the manufacture of heraldic items and issue certificates of authority to manufacture items under the provisions of AR 672-8.
  4. Approve designs for distinctive unit insignia (DUI), regimental distinctive insignia (RDI), and shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI), as authorized by this regulation.

2-4. The U.S. Army Materiel Command

The Commanding General, AMC will do the following:

  1. Operate the Project Manager-Soldier Systems Office.
  2. Ensure the performance of Army materiel management functions for clothing and individual equipment and centrally procured heraldic items, to include quality control.
  3. Operate the Uniform Quality Control Program (UQCP) for all optional uniforms and uniform items approved for wear by HQDA, except non-distinctive commercial component items of some optional uniforms, such as men’s white shirts, cuff links, and brand name footwear.

2-5. The U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service

  1. The U.S. Army and AAFES will operate, manage, and supervise the Army military clothing sales stores (AMCSS) program worldwide, in accordance with the terms of the memorandum of understanding between the Department of the Army and AAFES, Dallas, Texas.
  2. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the control, storage, and distribution of “issue” AMCSS inventories and optional-wear military clothing items from certified manufacturers, according to DA specifications, and as developed by the PM Soldier (SEQ), Bldg. 328, 5901 Putnam Road, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5852, in conjunction with the textile technology team at the Natick Soldier Center, Natick, MA 01760. (Optional-wear items are those not considered “issue” items.) Responsibility does not include war reserve stock management.

2-6. Commanders

  1. Commanders of MACOMs will thoroughly evaluate all proposals to change or add uniforms, accessories, or wear policies for uniforms, insignia, and awards that are submitted through the AIEP.
  2. The installation commander may prescribe the uniform for wear in formations. When not prescribed by the installation or subordinate commander, the unit commander will prescribe the uniform for wear in formation. Commanders will not establish seasonal wear dates for uniforms.
  3. Installation commanders in CONUS, MACOM commanders overseas, the Chief, Army Reserve for USAR, and State Adjutants General for the ARNG may publish, in writing, exceptions to the policy that authorizes the wear of utility and organizational uniforms off military installations (see para 3-3).
  4. The commander in charge of units on maneuver may prescribe the uniform for wear within the maneuver area.
  5. Ceremonial details and units.
    1. Members of honor guards, color guards, and similar details will wear the prescribed Army service, dress, or utility uniforms with authorized accouterments. These members may wear accessories authorized in CTA 50-900, such as individual equipment, belts, white gloves, and slings, when authorized by the commander. Commanders will prescribe uniform wear policies for these items.
    2. Only those units authorized to wear a distinctive uniform in accordance with CTA 50-900 for ceremonial duties, such as the Old Guard and the Army Band, are exempt from the policy to wear the Army service, dress, or utility uniforms in the performance of ceremonial duties. Commanders of special units will prescribe the wear policy for all distinctive uniform items and accouterments.
  6. Commanders will not require individuals to purchase optional uniform items. Likewise, they will not restrict or discourage them from wearing optional uniform items authorized by this regulation, except in those instances where uniformity is required, such as parades or formations.
  7. Commanders will conduct periodic inspections to ensure that all personnel under their command comply with the following:
    1. That soldiers possess the minimum quantities of uniforms prescribed in this regulation, AR 700-84, and CTA 50-900, tables 1, 2, and 3; and that the uniforms are properly fitted and in serviceable condition.
    2. That soldiers wear only authorized insignia and awards, as prescribed in this regulation.
    3. That soldiers wear only uniform and heraldic items produced by certified manufacturers, and that they meet the specifications for quality and design.
  8. Commanders will promptly submit quality deficiency reports on uniforms and individual equipment, in accordance with AR 702-7-1 and DA Pam 738-750, regarding those items that do not meet the requirements in paras 2-6(1-3), above.
  9. Commanders may purchase heraldic items through local procurement procedures only from manufacturers certified by TIOH.
  10. Overseas MACOM commanders will establish a service point of contact to provide information to local textile and uniform producers on optional uniforms and uniform items. Additionally, the point of contact will provide UQCP certification procedures to manufacturers desiring to sell these items to soldiers within the overseas theater.

2-7. Responsibilities of soldiers purchasing uniforms, uniform items, and heraldic items

  1. Soldiers purchasing uniforms, uniform items, or heraldic items from establishments other than the AMCSS must ensure that the items are authorized for wear and that they conform to appropriate military specifications or are manufactured in accordance with the UQCP or the heraldic quality control system. When items appear deficient, soldiers should submit a SF 368 (Product Quality Deficiency Report) through their servicing MCSS, where forms are available. Commercially purchased items that are authorized for wear in lieu of military-issue items must conform to the basic specification of the military-issue item, unless otherwise specified in this regulation.
    1. All Army uniforms, uniform items, and heraldic items procured by the Defense Logistics Agency and sold in the AMCSS are procured in accordance with appropriate military specifications and are authorized for wear. However, in those MCSS with multi-service support agreements, some items are sold that are authorized for wear by members of other services, but not by Army personnel. Soldiers are responsible for verifying with their chain of command which items are authorized for wear by Army personnel. Uniform items with defects in workmanship or material should be returned to the AMCSS for replacement or repair.
    2. Optional uniforms and other uniform clothing items sold in the MCSS, in post exchanges, or by commercial sources will contain a label, stamp, or certificate issued by the textile technology team at the Natick Soldier Center. Components of some optional uniforms, such as men’s commercial white shirts, studs, and cuff links, are not included in the UQCP.
    3. All heraldic items purchased from a post exchange, AMCSS, or commercial source will contain a hallmark or label certifying that the item was produced in accordance with the appropriate military specification by a manufacturer certified by TIOH, U.S. Army.
    4. All individuals purchasing uniform or insignia items from commercial sources must take care to ensure that the items conform to the requirements in 2-7a(1-3), above.
  2. All enlisted personnel will do the following:
    1. Maintain their clothing bag items and any supplemental clothing items they are issued, as prescribed in AR 700-84 or CTA 50-900.
    2. Ensure that their uniforms and insignia conform with this regulation.
  3. All officers will procure and maintain the uniforms and accessories appropriate to their assigned duties. Appendix C lists the minimum quantities of uniforms and other items normally prescribed by commanders for officers. (Note exceptions for officers on extended active duty for less than 6 months.) Officers are responsible for ensuring that their uniforms and insignia conform to specifications in this regulation.

2-8. Operation of the Uniform Quality Control Program

  1. The program executive officer (Program Executive Office (PEO) Soldier) and project manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment), in conjunction with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC), will oversee UQCP operations and will execute the following tasks:
    1. Prepare and maintain military specifications, purchase descriptions, and master patterns for optional uniform items, as prescribed by the Army Uniform Board and approved by the Chief of Staff, Army.
    2. Publish and disseminate periodic bulletins to industry that provide guidance and information regarding changes in military specifications, testing and certification requirements, uniform regulations, or adoption of new optional uniform items.
    3. Furnish specifications, purchase descriptions, master patterns, shade standards, and other information about optional uniforms to industry when required.
    4. Receive and examine laboratory test reports, manufacturer certifications, and samples from commercial manufacturers, custom tailors, military tailors, and other suppliers of optional uniform items, as required. Require manufacturers to provide requested laboratory test reports, manufacturer certifications, and samples of optional uniform items at no cost to the Army.
    5. Issue certificates of authority to manufacturers whose samples meet or exceed standards established by specifications of purchase descriptions. Certificates will be supplemented by documents showing the specific optional uniform items that the manufacturer is authorized to produce. Provide a list of certified manufacturers and products that will be furnished to the AAFES and included on appropriate Army Web sites. Revoke or suspend certificates when the certificate holder has violated any of the expressed conditions under which the certification was granted, as determined by PEO Soldier.
    6. Conduct inspections and otherwise monitor manufacturers for compliance with certificate terms and conditions. Review optional uniform items to verify compliance with, or appropriate exemption/waiver from, applicable domestic source requirements as set forth in 10 USC 2533a.
  2. The UQCP will be monitored overseas as follows: OCONUS Army service component command (ASCC) will establish a service POC who will inturn direct local textile and uniform producers desiring to sell optional uniform items to Soldiers within the theater to PEO Soldier, project manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment), or to NSRDEC for follow-on coordination.
  3. Manufacturers and suppliers of optional uniform items will
    1. Obtain certification required under the UQCP from NSRDEC or project manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment) before manufacturing any optional uniform items for sale.
    2. Affix a label with the following information certifying the optional uniform items were manufactured in accordance with the UQCP prior to offering the items for sale: This garment is warranted to meet or exceed the standards of specification number . . . and was produced under certificate number . . . from basic material warranted by the manufacturer as having been produced in accordance with the sample under current certification. This item is not authorized for turn-in to central issue facilities.
    3. Familiarize themselves with Army specifications, purchase descriptions, testing/certification requirements, shade standards, and other pertinent information for optional uniform items, and submit required samples and information to NSRDEC or project manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment) for approval.
    4. Comply with all terms of the certification. Certificates may be revoked or suspended if the certificate holder has violated any of the expressed conditions of the certification.

Part Two Utility and Selected Organization Uniforms

Chapter 3: Temperate, Hot-Weather, and Enhanced Hot-Weather Battle Dress Uniforms

3-1. Authorization for wear

The temperate, hot-weather, and enhanced hot-weather battle dress uniforms (BDUs) are authorized for year-round wear by all personnel when prescribed by the commander. (See figs 3-1 and 3-2.)

Figure 3-1. Temperate and hot-weather battle dress uniform, with beret, sleeves rolled

Figure 3-2. Temperate and hot-weather battle dress uniform, with patrol cap, sleeves down

3-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition.
    1. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (field jacket). Fabric is nylon and cotton sateen, wind resistant.
    2. Enhanced hot-weather coat and trousers. Fabric is 50/50 ripstop nylon and cotton poplin, in a four-color woodland camouflage pattern.
    3. Hot-weather coat and trousers. Fabric is 100 percent ripstop cotton, in a four-color woodland camouflage pattern.
    4. Temperate coat and trousers. Fabric is 50/50 nylon and cotton twill, in a four-color woodland camouflage pattern.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Beret. The black beret became the standard headgear for utility uniforms on 14 June 2001. The beret consists of a woolen knitted outer shell (lined or unlined) with a leather sweatband and an adjusting ribbon threaded through the binding. The beret is equipped with a stiffener on the left front for the attachment of organizational flashes and insignia.
    2. Cap, woodland camouflage pattern (patrol cap). The cap has a visor, a circular top crown, a side crown with an outside crown band, and retractable earflaps (temperate cap only; the hot-weather caps do not have retractable earflaps).
    3. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (field jacket). The coat is lined, hip length with a bi-swing back, with a convertible stand-up collar with concealed hood and a slide-fastener front closure, with two breast and two lower pockets. (See fig 3-3.)
    4. Coat, woodland camouflage pattern. The coat is a single-breasted “bush type” design with a collar and four patch bellows-type pockets with flaps (two chest and two lower). The coat has a straight-cut bottom, waist take-up tabs on both sides (old version only), and cuffed sleeves with reinforcement patches at the elbows. The enhanced hot-weather coat has a fused collar and pocket flaps, a suppressed waist (3 inches), and no waist adjustment tabs.
    5. Trousers, woodland camouflage pattern. The trousers have four standard type pockets and two leg bellows-type pockets, and reinforcement patches at the knees and buttocks. The trousers have a buttonhole fly with protective flap (hot-weather battle dress uniform), adjustable waist tabs (old version only), and leg-hem draw cords. The hot-weather battle dress uniform trousers with knee pleats are authorized for wear until current stocks are exhausted. The knee pleats were removed from the enhanced hot-weather battle dress uniform (EHWBDU) trousers.

Figure 3-3. Cold-weather coat, camouflage (field jacket)

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with these uniforms:
    1. Belt, web with open-faced black buckle (para 27-2 and ).
    2. Boots, combat, leather black (para 27-3).
    3. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    4. Coat, black all weather (para 27-8).
    5. Gloves, black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
    6. Handbags.
  2. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  3. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  4. Hat, drill sergeant (para 27-14).
  5. Military police accessories (para 27-16).
  6. Neckgaiter, optional purchase (para 27-17).
  7. Scarves.
    1. Black (with black overcoat only) (para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (para 27-21).
  8. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  9. Undergarments (paras 27-28).
  10. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  11. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander in accordance with CTA 50-900 or CTA 8-100 (medical personnel).
  12. Personal hydration systems, as determined by the commander.
  13. Classification. The temperate, enhanced hot-weather, and hot-weather BDUs are clothing bag issue utility uniforms. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

3-3. Occasions for wear

  1. Soldiers may wear BDUs on duty when prescribed by the commander. Soldiers may wear BDUs off post unless prohibited by the commander. They may not wear BDUs for commercial travel, unless authorized by para 1-10 of this regulation. Personnel may not wear BDUs in establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the establishment sells alcohol and food, soldiers may not wear utility uniforms if their activities in the establishment center on drinking alcohol only.
  2. Utility uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services and funerals. These uniforms are issued as utility, field, training, or combat uniforms and are not intended for wear as all-purpose uniforms when other uniforms are more appropriate.

3-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on these uniforms:

  1. Badges (subdued).
    1. Combat and special skill badges (pin on or embroidered sew on) (para 29-17).
    2. Special skill tabs (para 29-17).
    3. Subdued identification badges (para 29-18).
  2. Brassards (para 28-29).
  3. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12).
  4. Combat leaders identification (para 28-21).
  5. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-7).
  6. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  7. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  8. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, former wartime service (para 28-17(2)).
  9. Name and U.S. Army distinguishing tapes (paras 28-24 and 28-24).
  10. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
  11. Foreign badges are not authorized for wear on these uniforms.

3-5. Headgear

  1. Beret.
    1. General. The beret is the basic headgear for utility uniforms in garrison environments. The beret is not worn in the field, in training environments, or in environments where the wear of the beret is impractical, as determined by the commander. Additionally, the beret is not worn on deployments unless authorized by the commander. Personnel being transferred from one organization to another may continue to wear the beret and flash of the former unit until they report for duty at the new organization.
    2. Wear. The beret is worn so that the headband (edge binding) is straight across the forehead, 1 inch above the eyebrows. The flash is positioned over the left eye, and the excess material is draped over to the right ear, extending to at least the top of the ear, and no lower than the middle of the ear. Personnel will cut off the ends of the adjusting ribbon and secure the ribbon knot inside the edge binding at the back of the beret. When worn properly, the beret is formed to the shape of the head; therefore, soldiers may not wear hairstyles that cause distortion of the beret. Paragraph 3-5, below, addresses wear of headgear insignia. Figures 3-1 and 3-4 show wear of the beret. Soldiers wear berets as indicated below:
    3. Black beret.

Figure 3-4. Wear of the beret, male and female

  1. Soldiers who are not assigned to units or positions authorized wear of the tan, green, or maroon berets will wear the black beret. This includes senior and junior ROTC instructors, unless otherwise indicated below.
  2. Soldiers are issued the black beret upon assignment to their first permanent duty assignment after the completion of initial entry training or officer/warrant officer basic courses. Cadets and officer/warrant officer candidates will not wear the black beret. Split-option soldiers or soldiers in the simultaneous membership program will wear the black beret only when performing duties with their units, and they will wear the patrol cap with the BDU, as described in paragraph 3-5 below, when in a cadet or trainee status. Soldiers who have not been issued or who do not wear the black beret will wear the patrol cap with the BDU, as indicated in paragraph 3-5 below. In those cases where beret sustainment levels are not sufficient for turn-in and reissue of unserviceable berets, the commander can authorize the temporary wear of the patrol cap until the beret can be replaced.
  3. The Army flash is the only flash authorized for wear on the black beret, unless authorization for another flash was granted before the implementation of the black beret as the standard Army headgear (for example, Opposing Forces (OPFOR) elements).
  4. Ranger tan beret. Soldiers currently assigned to the following units are authorized wear of the Ranger tan beret. Personnel will wear the approved flash of the unit to which they are assigned.
    1. 75th Ranger Regiment.
    2. Ranger Training Brigade.
    3. Ranger-qualified soldiers in the following units or positions, if they previously served in the 75th Ranger Regiment: U.S. Special Operations Command; U.S. Army Special Operations Command; U.S. Special Operations Command Joint Task Force; and Theater Special Operations Command. The 75th Ranger Regiment is the sole authority for validation of service in the Ranger Regiment.
  5. Green beret.
    1. If approved by local commanders, all Special Forces-qualified personnel (those carrying the Special Forces MOSs of 18A or 180A, CMF 18, and CSMs reclassified from 18Z to OOZ) are authorized to wear the green beret. This includes senior and junior ROTC instructors and those attending training at an Army service school in a student status (for example, Command and General Staff College, Defense Language Institute, or United States Army Sergeants Major Academy).
    2. Special Forces personnel will wear the approved flash of the unit to which they are assigned. Special Forces personnel who are assigned to an organization without an approved flash will wear the generic SF flash (the flash approved for personnel assigned to SF positions, but not assigned to SF units).
  6. Maroon beret. All personnel assigned to airborne units whose primary missions are airborne operations wear the maroon beret. The airborne designation for a unit is found in the unit modification table of organization and equipment (MTOE). Other soldiers authorized to wear the maroon beret are indicated below. Personnel will wear the approved flash of the unit to which they are assigned.
    1. Active Army advisors to reserve airborne units on jump status.
    2. All personnel assigned to the airborne departments of the U.S. Army Infantry School and the U.S. Army Quartermaster School.
    3. All personnel assigned to long-range surveillance detachments designated as airborne.
    4. All personnel assigned to the airborne/airlift action office.
    5. Recruiters of the Special Operations Recruiting Company (SORC), U.S. Army Recruiting Command. Personnel will wear the USASOC flash.
    6. All personnel assigned to the airborne procurement team.
    7. All personnel assigned to 55th Signal Company Airborne Combat Camera Documentation Team.
    8. All personnel assigned to 982d Combat Signal Company airborne platoons.
    9. All personnel assigned to rigger detachments.
  7. Patrol cap.
    1. The patrol cap (formerly called the BDU cap) is worn with the BDU in field environments when the Kevlar helmet is not worn; on work details; or in other environments where the wear of the beret is impractical, as determined by the commander. Additionally, personnel in initial training categories who do not wear the black beret (see para 3-5(3)(b), above) wear the patrol cap with the BDU. The patrol cap is available in the hot-weather and temperate fabrics.
    2. Personnel wear the patrol cap straight on the head so that the cap band creates a straight line around the head, parallel to the ground. The patrol cap will fit snugly and comfortably around the largest part of the head without distortion or excessive gaps. The cap is worn so that no hair is visible on the forehead beneath the cap. At their discretion, individuals may wear the earflaps down during cold weather, except in formation when the commander may prescribe wear policy (see fig 3-2).
  8. Headgear insignia. (See para 28-3 for placement of headgear insignia and beret flashes.)
    1. Beret. Officers and warrant officers wear non-subdued grade insignia centered on the beret flash, and chaplains wear their branch insignia. Enlisted personnel wear their distinctive unit insignia (DUI) centered on the beret flash. Enlisted personnel assigned to units not authorized the DUI wear their regimental distinctive insignia (RDI). General officers may wear full-, medium-, or miniature-sized stars on the beret. Stars are centered horizontally on the flash point-to-point, and they may be mounted on a bar as an option. Overlap of the stars beyond the flash is authorized.
    2. Patrol cap. Commissioned and warrant officers wear non-subdued grade insignia on the patrol cap in garrison environments; chaplains wear non-subdued branch insignia. In field environments, commissioned and warrant officers wear subdued grade insignia; chaplains wear subdued branch insignia. Enlisted personnel wear subdued grade insignia on the patrol cap in garrison and field environments.

3-6. General guidelines

  1. These uniforms are designed to fit loosely; alterations to make them fit tightly are not authorized. A tight fit reduces the airflow needed for ventilation and cooling. The only alterations authorized are those listed in AR 700-84. Personnel are authorized to mix and match hot-weather and enhanced hot-weather coats, trousers, and patrol caps. However, personnel may not mix hot-weather and temperate uniform items, to include the patrol cap.
  2. The coat is worn outside the trousers, and the trousers are worn with a belt. The coat will not extend below the top of the cargo pocket on the pants and will not be higher than the bottom of the side pocket on the pants. Commanders may authorize exceptions to this policy under conditions deemed appropriate in the interest of health, comfort, and efficiency because of climatic conditions, or to accommodate a soldier’s religious practices in accordance with AR 600-20, para 5-6.
  3. Soldiers will wear the trousers bloused, using the draw cords or blousing rubbers, if the trousers are not tucked into the boots. Personnel will not wrap the trouser leg around the leg tightly enough to present a pegged appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. When soldiers wear the sleeves of the coat rolled up, the camouflage pattern will remain exposed. Personnel will roll the sleeves neatly above the elbow, no more than 3 inches above the elbow.
  4. The commander may require that soldiers press these uniforms for special occasions when an especially sharp appearance is required, such as parades, reviews, inspections, or other ceremonial occasions. Although soldiers are authorized to starch the BDU, commanders may not require them to do so. Soldiers are authorized to press military creases in the BDU coat (see para 1-9(4)).
  5. When uniformity in appearance is required, commanders may prescribe a specific uniform for formations or ceremonial occasions, such as parades. When a specific uniform is not prescribed, soldiers may wear the enhanced hot-weather, hot-weather, or temperate BDU, or other authorized utility uniforms.
  6. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with utility uniforms without cold-weather outer garments, provided that sleeves are rolled down. Personnel may wear the woodland camouflage cold-weather coat with all utility uniforms. Soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat as a raincoat with these uniforms only in a garrison environment when they have not been issued organizational raingear. When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but are not required to do so. Coats are worn buttoned and zipped, and the shirt collar is worn inside the cold-weather coat and other outer garments. Soldiers may wear the hood of the cold-weather coat at their option. However, when the hood is not worn, soldiers will tuck it into the jacket and will zip the zipper. Female personnel may carry handbags with these uniforms only while in a garrison environment.
  7. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 4: Maternity Work Uniform

4-1. Authorization for wear

The Army maternity work uniform is authorized for year-round duty wear by pregnant soldiers, when prescribed by the commander. (See fig 4-1.)

Figure 4-1. Maternity work uniform

4-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. Fabric is 100 percent ripstop cotton (old fabric blend), or a 50/50 nylon and cotton ripstop poplin (new fabric blend).
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, patrol (formerly BDU) (para 3-2(2)).
    3. Coat, cold weather, camouflage pattern (para 3-2(1)).
    4. Coat, maternity, woodland camouflage pattern. A single-breasted coat style design with a collar, two patch pockets with flaps, a straight-cut bottom, sleeve tabs, and pleated side-body panels with take-up tabs.
    5. Trousers, maternity, woodland camouflage pattern. The trousers have a front stretch panel with an elasticized waistband and side pockets, with flaps on both legs.
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with this uniform.
    1. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    2. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7)
    3. Coat, black all weather (para 27-8). (See para 4-5 for wear policy.)
    4. Gloves, black, leather shell, with inserts (para 27-12).
    5. Handbags.
  4. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  5. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  6. Hat, drill sergeant (para 27-14).
  7. Military Police accessories (para 27-16).
  8. Neckgaiter (para 27-17).
  9. Scarves.
    1. Black (with black overcoat only) (para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (para 27-21).
  10. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  11. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  12. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  13. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander, according to CTA 50-900.
  14. Personal hydration systems, as determined by the commander.
  15. Classification. The maternity work uniform is an organizationally issued utility and field uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

4-3. Occasions for wear

  1. The maternity work uniform is worn on duty when prescribed by the commander. Females may wear the maternity work BDUs off post unless prohibited by the commander. They may not wear the maternity work uniform for commercial travel, unless authorized by para 1-10 of this regulation. Soldiers may not wear the maternity work uniform in establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the establishment sells alcohol and food, soldiers may not wear utility uniforms if their activities in the establishment center on drinking alcohol only.
  2. Utility uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services and funerals. The maternity work uniform is issued as an organizational utility or field maternity uniform and is not intended for wear when other maternity uniforms are more appropriate.

4-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on the maternity work uniform.

  1. Badges, special skill (para 29-17).
  2. Brassards (para 28-29).
  3. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12).
  4. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, and 28-7).
  5. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  6. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  7. Shoulder sleeve insignia-former wartime service (para 28-17(2)).
  8. Name and U.S. Army distinguishing tapes (paras 28-24 and 28-24).
  9. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
  10. Personnel will not wear foreign badges on this uniform.

4-5. General guidelines

  1. This uniform is designed to fit loosely; alterations to make the uniform fit tightly are not authorized. A tight fit reduces the airflow needed for ventilation and cooling. The coat is worn outside the trousers. Soldiers will not wear a belt with this uniform. Soldiers will wear the trousers bloused, using the draw cords or blousing rubbers, if the trousers are not tucked into the boots. Personnel will not wrap the trouser legs around the leg tightly enough to present a pegged appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. When soldiers wear the sleeves of the coat rolled up, the camouflage pattern will remain exposed. Personnel will roll the sleeves neatly above the elbow, no more than 3 inches above the elbow.
  2. The commander may require that soldiers press the maternity work uniform when an especially sharp appearance is required for special occasions, such as parades, reviews, inspections, or other ceremonial occasions. Soldiers are authorized to starch the maternity work uniform; however, commanders may not require soldiers to do so. Soldiers are authorized to press military creases in the BDU coat (see para 1-9(4)).
  3. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001. (See para 3-5 of this regulation for wear policy of the beret and other headgear.)
  4. Soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat with the uniform in garrison. When coats are worn, soldiers may wear them unbuttoned and unzipped, if necessary. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with this uniform without cold weather outer garments, provided that the sleeves are rolled down. When the cold weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Soldiers will wear the shirt collar inside the cold-weather coat and other outer garments. Personnel may carry handbags with this uniform, but only while in a garrison environment.
  5. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 5: Desert Battle Dress Uniform

5-1. Authorization for wear

The desert battle dress uniform (DBDU) is authorized for year-round wear by all personnel when issued as organizational clothing and prescribed by the commander. (See figs 5-1 through 5-4.)

Figure 5-1. Desert battle dress uniform, daytime pattern, officer, with desert BDU hat

Figure 5-2. Desert battle dress uniform, daytime pattern, enlisted, with beret

Figure 5-3. Desert BDU cap

Figure 5-4. Desert battle dress uniform, nighttime pattern

5-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition.
    1. Desert coat, trousers and hat. Fabric is 50/50 cotton and nylon twill (old weight material) or 50/50 cotton and nylon ripstop (new weight material), with infrared protection characteristics, and it is printed with a three-color desert camouflage pattern.
    2. Desert coat, cold weather. Fabric is 50/50 cotton and nylon sateen, wind resistant, and it is printed with a three-color desert camouflage pattern.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Coat, desert camouflage, daytime pattern. The coat is a bush-type design with a collar and four patch bellows-type pockets with flaps (two chest and two lower). The coat has a straight-cut bottom, suppressed waist, and cuffed sleeves with reinforcement patches at the elbows.
    2. Coat, cold weather, desert. The coat is lined, hip length with a bi-swing back, a convertible stand-up collar with concealed hood, and a slide-fastener front closure with two breast, and two lower pockets.
    3. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    4. Hat, desert camouflage. The hat has a stiff crown with a standard width, quilted stitched brim, a chinstrap, and a camouflage band.
    5. Cap, patrol, desert. The cap has a visor, a circular top crown, a side crown with an outside crown band, and retractable earflaps.
    6. Parka, desert camouflage, night pattern. The parka has a hood, a button front closure, two slit-type hand openings with flaps, draw cords at neck, hood, waist, and hemline, and buttons on the inside for the attachment of a liner.
    7. Trousers, desert camouflage, daytime pattern. The trousers have four standard-type pockets, two leg bellows-type pockets, and reinforcement patches at the knees and buttocks, a buttonhole fly, adjustable waist tabs, and leg hem draw cords.
    8. Trousers, desert camouflage, night pattern. The trousers have a front opening, two side slit-type openings with flaps, and two hip patch pockets with flaps.
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the DBDU.
    1. Belt, web with open-faced black buckle (paras 27-2 and ).
    2. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3) or desert tan when issued in accordance with CTA 50-900.
    3. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    4. Gloves, black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
    5. Handbags.
  4. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  5. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  6. Military Police accessories (para 27-17).
  7. Neckerchief, brown, LIN M95975, CTA 50-900.
  8. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  9. Undergarments (paras 27-28).
  10. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  11. Organizational clothing and equipment, as prescribed by the commander in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  12. Desert personal hydration system, as determined by the commander.
  13. Classification. The DBDU is an organizationally issued utility, field, training, or combat uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

5-3. Occasions for wear

  1. Personnel wear the DBDU on duty when prescribed by the commander. Soldiers may wear the DBDU off post, unless prohibited by the commander. They may not wear DBDUs for commercial travel, unless authorized by paragraph 1-10 of this regulation. Personnel may not wear DBDUs in establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the establishment sells alcohol and food, soldiers may not wear utility uniforms if their activities in the establishment center on drinking alcohol only.
  2. Utility uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off of the installation, such as memorial services and funerals. These uniforms are issued as organizational utility, field, training, or combat uniforms, and they are not intended for wear as all-purpose uniforms when other uniforms are more appropriate.

5-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on the DBDU.

  1. Badges (subdued).
    1. Combat and special skill badges (pin-on or embroidered sew-on) (para 29-17).
    2. Special skill tabs (para 29-17(1)(b)).
    3. Subdued identification badges (para 29-18).
  2. Brassards (para 28-29).
  3. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12).
  4. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-7).
  5. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  6. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  7. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, former wartime service (SSI-FWTS) (para 28-17(2)).
  8. Name and U.S. Army distinguishing tapes (paras 28-24 and 28-24).
  9. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
  10. Foreign badges are not authorized for wear on this uniform.

5-5. General guidelines

  1. The DBDU is designed to fit loosely and alterations are not authorized. The coat is worn outside the trousers, and the trousers are worn belted. Commanders may authorize exceptions to this policy under conditions deemed appropriate in the interest of health, comfort, and efficiency because of climatic conditions, or to accommodate a soldier’s religious practices, in accordance with AR 600-20, para 5-6.
  2. Soldiers are required to wear the nametape, U.S. Army tape, and the SSI, current organization. However, they have the option of wearing the SSI-FWTS, and they may wear either pin-on or sew-on rank, branch insignia, and subdued badges. If soldiers choose to wear optional sew-on insignia, they will bear all costs associated with the application and removal of the insignia. This includes any damage to the organizational DBDU. All optional insignia must be removed from the DBDU prior to returning the garment to organizational stock.
  3. Soldiers will wear the trousers bloused, using the draw cords or blousing rubbers, if the trousers are not tucked into the boots. Personnel will not wrap the trouser legs around the leg tightly enough to present a pegged appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. When sleeves are rolled up, the camouflage pattern will remain exposed. Personnel will roll the sleeves neatly above the elbow, no more than 3 inches above the elbow.
  4. The commander may require that soldiers press this uniform for special occasions when an especially sharp appearance is required, such as for parades, reviews, inspections, or other ceremonial occasions. Soldiers may press the DBDU, but they are not authorized to starch the uniform.
  5. Headgear. The desert patrol cap, desert camouflage hat, and the beret are the authorized headgear for this uniform. The commander will determine which headgear soldiers wear on the basis of mission requirements. Soldiers wear the desert camouflage hat so that no hair is visible on the forehead, and with the chinstrap pulled up under the chin (see figure 5-1). The desert patrol cap is worn in the same fashion as the woodland patrol cap (formerly the BDU cap) (refer to para 3-5 for wear of the patrol cap and the beret). Figures 5-1, 5-2, and 5-3 show the wear of the desert camouflage hat, desert patrol cap, and the beret.
  6. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with utility uniforms without cold-weather outer garments, provided sleeves are rolled down. When the parka is worn, soldiers will wear it buttoned and will wear the shirt collar inside the parka. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with this uniform when they wear the parka, but they are not required to do so.
  7. Commanders may authorize the use of a desert camouflage personal hydration system only in desert environments. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 6: Aircrew Battle Dress Uniform

6-1. Authorization for wear

The aircrew battle dress uniform (ABDU) is authorized for year-round wear by aircrew members, as specified in CTA 50-900, when prescribed by the commander. (See fig 6-1.)

Figure 6-1. Aircrew battle dress uniform

6-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition.
    1. Aircrew coat and trousers. The fabric is a blend of 92 percent NOMEX, 5 percent Kevlar, and 3 percent static dissipative fiber in a plain weave, printed with a four-color woodland camouflage pattern and tan 380.
    2. Aircrew cold-weather clothing system jacket, liner and hood. The jacket shell fabric is a blend of 92 percent NOMEX, 5 percent Kevlar, and 3 percent static dissipative fiber, oxford weave, in a four-color woodland camouflage. The lining is a blend of 92 percent NOMEX, 5 percent Kevlar, and 3 percent static dissipative fiber, plain weave, camouflage green in color. The jacket liner fabric is a quilted NOMEX batting, camouflage green in color. The hood main body is an oxford aramid cloth, in a woodland camouflage pattern, with a batting lining and synthetic fur ruff.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, patrol (formerly BDU) (para 3-2(2)).
    3. Jacket, aircrew, cold-weather clothing system, woodland camouflage pattern. The jacket is a single-breasted design with a slide-fastener front closure, fully lined, and it has draw cords at the waist and hem. The jacket has a collar, two bellows-type chest pockets, two lower hanging pockets, a left-sleeve utility pocket, shoulder loops, reinforced elbows, and wrist tabs with hook-and-loop tape adjustments. The jacket has buttons located in the neck and inside facings for the cold-weather liner attachment. All pockets have flaps with hook-and-loop closures to meet aviator-specific needs. The jacket liner is a collarless cardigan style, with underarm vent openings and knitted cuffs. The liner can be buttoned into the jacket or self-buttoned for wear alone in cold-weather conditions. The hood attaches to the jacket with snap fasteners and closes with a draw cord and hook-and-pile fastener tape. The hood can be worn over the flyer’s helmet.
    4. Coat, aircrew, woodland camouflage pattern. The coat is a single- breasted bush-type design with a slide-fastener front closure, collar, four patch-type pockets with flaps (two upper and two lower), and a left-sleeve utility pocket with flap. The coat has a straight-cut bottom, adjustment tabs with hook-and-loop tape at the waist, collar, and wrists, and reinforcement patches at the elbows. All pockets use hook-and-loop closures to meet aviator-specific needs.
    5. Trousers, aircrew, woodland camouflage pattern. The trousers contain four standard-type pockets, two side-opening, leg cargo-type pockets, and two top-opening calf patch pockets. All pockets have flaps, except for the front hanging pockets. Hook-and-loop closures are used on the pockets and pocket flaps to meet aviator-specific needs. The trousers have a slide-fastener fly closure, adjustable straps at the waist, and leg hem drawcords.
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with these uniforms.
    1. Balaclava, hood, LIN H46881, CTA 50-900.
    2. Belt, web, with open-faced black buckle (paras 27-2 and ).
    3. Bib, overall, LIN P37820.
    4. Boots, combat, black leather (para 27-3).
    5. Gloves, flyer’s, LIN J67052.
    6. Handbags.
  4. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  5. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  6. Neckgaiter (para 27-17)
  7. Scarf, olive- green 208 (para 27-21).
  8. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  9. Undergarments (paras 27-28).
  10. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  11. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander, in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  12. Sweater, wool, black or green.
  13. Sweater, wool, brown, with partial front buttons and short collar.
  14. Personal hydration system, as determined by the commander.
  15. Classification. The aircrew battle dress uniform is an organizational issue flight utility uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

6-3. Occasions for wear

  1. Soldiers may wear ABDUs on duty when prescribed by the commander for flight operations. Soldiers may wear ABDUs off post, unless prohibited by the commander. They may not wear ABDUs for commercial travel, unless authorized by para 1-10 of this regulation. Personnel may not wear ABDUs in establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the establishment sells alcohol and food, soldiers may not wear utility uniforms if their activities in the establishment center on drinking alcohol only.
  2. Utility uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services and funerals. These uniforms are issued as utility uniforms and are not intended for wear as all-purpose uniforms when other uniforms are more appropriate.

6-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on these uniforms. Only embroidered insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on the ABDU.

  1. Badges (subdued).
    1. Combat and special skill badges (para 29-17).
    2. Special skill tabs (para 29-17).
    3. Identification badges (para 29-18).
  2. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12).
  3. Combat leaders identification (para 28-21).
  4. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, and 28-7).
  5. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  6. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  7. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, former wartime service (SSI-FWTS) (para 28-17(2)).
  8. Name and U.S. Army distinguishing tapes (paras 28-24 and 28-24).
  9. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
  10. Foreign badges are not authorized for wear on this uniform.

6-5. General guidelines

  1. Basic uniform. The ABDU is for use by flight crews and personnel in other selected MOSs (military occupational specialties), as prescribed in CTA 50-900. It will not be worn as a substitute for the BDU when the BDU is more appropriate. Insignia is worn on the ABDU the same way as on the BDU; personnel will not wear the leather nameplates that are worn on the flight uniform. These uniforms are designed to be slightly loose fitting; alterations to make them form fitting are not authorized. The coat is worn outside the trousers for all duties, to include flight. The trousers are worn with the standard black cotton web belt. The coat will not extend below the top of the cargo pocket on the pants, and it will not extend higher than the bottom of the side pocket on the pants. Soldiers will keep sleeves down on the ABDU during flight operations (see fig 6-1).
  2. Soldiers are required to wear rank, nametape, U.S. Army tape, and the SSI, current organization. However, they have the option of wearing the SSI-FWTS, branch insignia, and badges. If soldiers choose to wear the optional insignia, they will bear all costs associated with the application and removal of the insignia. This includes any damage to the organizational ABDU. All optional insignia must be removed from the ABDU prior to returning the garment to organizational stock.
  3. Soldiers are not authorized to blouse the trousers inside the boots during the execution of flight crew duties. When not performing flight duties and the trousers are bloused, soldiers will use the draw cords or blousing rubbers if the trousers are not tucked into the boots. Personnel will not wrap the trouser legs around the leg tightly enough to present a pegged appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. When soldiers wear the sleeves of the coat rolled up, the camouflage pattern will remain exposed. Personnel will roll the sleeves neatly above the elbow, no more than 3 inches above the elbow. Soldiers will not press or starch the ABDU.
  4. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001. The beret will be worn when soldiers are not performing flight duties, unless the commander has prescribed wear of the patrol cap, as described in chapter 3 of this regulation. When soldiers wear the patrol cap, they may wear either the temperate or the hot-weather headgear with the ABDU. (See para 3-5 for wear policy concerning the beret and the patrol cap.)
  5. The black leather combat boot and the black leather flyer’s insulated boot (when authorized according to CTA 50-900) are the authorized footwear for the ABDU. Soldiers will not wear the jungle boot with the ABDU.
  6. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with these uniforms when not performing crew duties. They may wear the gloves without cold-weather outer garments, provided sleeves are rolled down. The flight jacket is the only authorized cold-weather coat for wear with the ABDU. The aircrew cold weather clothing system jacket will serve as the ABDU flight jacket. Soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat as a raincoat with these uniforms when they have not been issued organizational raingear, but only in a garrison environment and only when they are not performing flight operations. Personnel will wear coats buttoned and zipped. The shirt collar will be worn inside the cold-weather coat and other outer garments. Soldiers may wear the hood of the cold-weather coat at their discretion. Female personnel may carry handbags with these uniforms only while in a garrison environment.
  7. Commanders may authorize other uniforms for wear during administrative flights after performing the proper risk assessment. Local commanders may authorize the wear of solid baseball caps (when authorized per CTA 50-900) by aircraft and ground crewmembers while on the flight line or in the base operations area, as a safety and identification measure. Soldiers will wear standard headgear outside these areas. Personnel will wear insignia of grade on organizational baseball caps in accordance with paragraph 28-3. Commanders will provide the caps to individuals at no cost.
  8. Protective clothing and equipment for flight crews are specified in AR 95-1, paragraph 8-9.
  9. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment, unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 7: Cold-Weather Uniform

7-1. Authorization for wear

The OG 108 cold-weather uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all personnel, when issued as organizational clothing and prescribed by the commander. (See fig 7-1.)

Figure 7-1. Cold-weather uniform

7-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. Fabric is wool serge, olive-green shade 108.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, patrol (formerly BDU) (para 3-2(2)).
    3. Cap, cold-weather, woodland camouflage pattern or OG 107 (pile cap). The cap is a fully lined cold-weather head covering, with a turndown forehead flap, a three-piece crown, a stretch gusset with an elastic strip at the center back, and earflaps with a nylon fastener hook-and-pile type overlap closure. (See fig 7-2.)
    4. Shirt, wool serge, OG 108 (male). The shirt has two buttoned chest pockets, cuffed, buttoned sleeves, and a front button closure.
    5. Shirt, wool serge, OG 108 (female). The shirt has three pockets, two chest pockets with buttoned flaps, an upper sleeve pocket, cuffed, buttoned sleeves, and a front button closure. (See fig 7-3.)
    6. Trousers, cold-weather, OG 107. Fabric is cotton and nylon, wind resistant. The trousers have hip pockets, side front cargo pockets, waist adjustment straps, a slide-fastener fly, and leg draw cords.
    7. Trousers, wool serge, OG 108. The trousers have four patch pockets (two in front, two in back) with flaps and a covered front zipper opening.

Figure 7-2. Cold-weather cap, camouflage

Figure 7-3. Wool serge shirt, female

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the cold-weather uniform.
    1. Belt, web with open-faced black buckle (para 27-2 and ).
    2. Coat, cold-weather, woodland camouflage pattern (BDU field jacket) (para 3-2(3)).
    3. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    4. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    5. Gloves, black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
    6. Military Police accessories (para 27-16).
    7. Neckgaiter (para 27-17).
    8. Scarf, olive- green 208 (para 27-21).
    9. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
    10. Undergarments (paras 27-28).
    11. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
    12. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  2. Classification. The OG 108 uniform is an organizationally issued field uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

7-3. Occasions for wear

Soldiers may wear the OG 108 uniform only on duty, when prescribed by the commander. The OG 108 uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except in transit between the individual’s quarters and duty station. (See para 1-10 for exceptions to this policy.) The OG 108 uniform is an organizationally issued field uniform and is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate. Personnel may wear components of this uniform with utility and other organizational uniforms as part of a cold-weather ensemble, when issued and prescribed by the commander.

7-4. Insignia and accouterments

The insignia and accouterments authorized for wear on the cold-weather uniform follow.

  1. Badges, combat and special skill, subdued pin-on only (para 29-17).
  2. Brassards (para 28-29).
  3. Branch insignia, subdued pin-on only (paras 28-10 and 28-12).
  4. Combat leaders identification (on cold-weather coats (field jackets) and extended cold-weather clothing system (Gortex) parka only) (para 28-21).
  5. Grade insignia, subdued pin-on (para 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  6. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  7. Name and Army distinguishing tapes (paras 28-24 and 28-24).
  8. Shoulder sleeve insignia (current organization and former wartime service) is not authorized for wear on the OG 108 shirts. When the OG 108 shirt is prescribed for wear only as an undergarment, soldiers will not wear collar insignia and name and U.S. Army distinguishing tapes on the shirt.
  9. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
  10. Foreign badges, sew-on badges, and sew-on grade insignia are not authorized for wear on this uniform.

7-5. General guidelines

  1. The OG 108 uniform is designed to fit loosely, with tabs available for adjustment. Alterations are not authorized. Soldiers should not wear the OG 108 shirt and trousers as outer garments if they could become unduly soiled, snagged, or otherwise damaged in the performance of duties. When the shirt is worn as an outer garment, it is worn inside the trousers and a belt is worn with the trousers. When the trousers are worn as an outer garment, soldiers will blouse the trousers, using the draw cords or blousing rubbers, if the trousers are not tucked into the boots. Personnel will not wrap the trouser legs around the leg tightly enough to present a pegged appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. (See fig 7-1.) Soldiers will not roll up the sleeves of the OG 108 shirt. Female soldiers may wear either the male or female OG 108 shirt. Female Army Medical Department (AMEDD) officers may wear the cold-weather clothing as prescribed in CTA 50-900.
  2. The beret, patrol cap, or the cold-weather caps are authorized for wear with this uniform. (See para 3-5 for wear policy of the beret and patrol cap.) When the cold-weather cap is worn properly, no hair is visible on the forehead. When the earflaps are worn down, they are fastened under the chin; when they are worn up, they are fastened to the cap.
  3. Soldiers may wear the black leather shell gloves with utility uniforms without cold-weather outer garments, provided that sleeves are rolled down. When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Coats are worn buttoned and zipped, and the shirt collar is worn inside the cold-weather coat and other outer garments. The cold-weather parka is authorized for wear with the cold-weather trousers (OG 107), or as prescribed by the commander. Figures 7-1 and 7-3 show the cold-weather uniform.
  4. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment, unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

7-6. Extended cold-weather clothing system

The extended cold-weather clothing system (ECWCS) is authorized for wear in accordance with CTA 50-900.

7-7. Composition and classification

  1. The following are the components of the ECWCS.
    1. Parka, cold-weather, camouflage.
  2. The parka fabric is a triple-layer, laminated, waterproof, windproof, and moisture-vapor permeable nylon material. The garment repels water, but it is sufficiently porous to prevent moisture buildup from perspiration. The parka has a hood with an attachment piece that allows fastening of the fur ruff; inside map pockets that can be opened without unzipping the parka; two large lower cargo pockets, and a two-way, full-front slide fastener to provide full-face protection, leaving only the eyes uncovered. The parka is woodland camouflage and fully lined with a windskirt. There are elastic drawcords with barrel locks at the waist, and a woven nylon tape drawcord with barrel locks at the hood. Nylon hook-and-pile fastener tapes are located at the wrist tabs to allow for adjustment along the full-front closure on the overlay of the slide fastener, on the windskirt, and on the lower front pockets. The parka is authorized for wear as an organizational issue item.
  3. Soldiers will wear insignia of rank and the nametape on the parka. The insignia of rank is centered on the tab located in the center of the chest. Soldiers may wear either pin-on or embroidered slip-on cloth loop insignia of rank. The nametape is worn on the pocket flap of the left sleeve of the parka (see para 28-24(2)(b)).
  4. Trousers, cold-weather, camouflage. The trousers are made from a triple-layer, laminated, waterproof, windproof, and moisture-vapor permeable nylon material that repels water, but the material is sufficiently porous to prevent moisture buildup from perspiration. The trousers have seat and knee patches, pass-through pockets, and zippered leg openings to allow easy donning and doffing without removing the footwear. Nylon hook-and-pile fastener tapes are located at the ankle tabs to allow for adjustment. The fly has a slide-fastener closure. Nylon tape suspender loops are located at the waist.
  5. Trousers, cold-weather, field, nylon and cotton. The trousers are made from a wind-resistant nylon and cotton fabric. Characteristics of the trousers are side-hanging pockets, hip pockets, cargo pockets, drawcords at the trousers bottoms, and adjustable waist straps. The trousers are worn over the liners as a durable, insulating layer when the cold-weather trouser is not needed.
  6. Liner, cold-weather parka. The coat liner is an olive-green undergarment of polyester-covered batting, covered with three plies of ripstop nylon cloth. The liner serves as an insulating layer for the upper body, and it may be worn independently of the parka.
  7. Liner, cold-weather trousers, field. The trouser liner is an olive-green undergarment of polyester-covered batting, covered with two plies of ripstop nylon cloth. The liner serves as the insulating layer for the lower body, and it may be worn independently of the cold-weather trousers.
  8. Shirt, cold weather, fleece. The shirt is made from a knitted polyester fiber pile. It has reinforced shoulder and elbow patches, a convertible turtleneck collar, front zipper, elastic drawcord waist, hook-and-pile cuff tabs, two chest cargo-style pockets, and two lower hand-warmer pockets. The shirt is the primary insulating layer for the upper body.
  9. Overalls, cold weather, fleece. The overalls are made from a knitted polyester fiber pile. They have elastic suspenders with quick release buckles, and full-length, side-seam slide fasteners. The overalls are worn as an additional layer when temperatures are -25 degrees to -60 degrees Fahrenheit.
  10. Undershirt, cold weather, polypropylene. The material used for the undershirt is a knitted, brushed, multi-filament polypropylene. It has a center-front zipper that extends to the middle of the chest area, allowing for ventilation of the neck and chest areas. The undershirt layer next to the skin acts as a moisture-wicking layer, serving to draw moisture away from the skin and transferring it to the outer layers of the system.
  11. Drawers, cold weather, polypropylene. The material used for the drawers is a knitted, brushed, multi-filament polypropylene. The drawers serve as the base layer for the lower extremities.
  12. Parka, snow camouflage, white. The parka is made from a lightweight, white nylon filament, water-repellant treated cloth. The parka has a snap-fastener front closure, storage pouch, elastic wrists, and drawcords at the waist, hood, and bottom. The parka is used as a camouflage outer layer in snow terrain, but it is not a substitute for the camouflage cold-weather parka.
  13. Trousers, snow camouflage, white. The trousers are made from a lightweight, white nylon filament, water-repellant, treated cloth. The trousers have front pass-through pockets, cargo pockets with flaps, suspender loops, inside button tabs for attaching a button-in liner, slide fastener openings on legs, a waist drawcord, storage pouch, and elastic cord leg bottoms. The trousers are used as a camouflage outer layer in snow terrain, but they are not a substitute for the camouflage cold-weather trouser, or for the field cold-weather trouser made from nylon and cotton.
  14. Hood, balaclava, cold weather. The hood is constructed of two plies of a black, knitted wool blend with a nylon wind-barrier interlining. The design is a pull-over-the-head style with an adjustable face opening.
  15. Ruff, parka, extended cold weather. The ruff is made from the same triple layer, laminated, waterproof, windproof, and moisture-vapor permeable nylon as the parka and trousers. One side of the ruff incorporates the synthetic fur, with hook-and-pile fasteners and snap fasteners on the opposite side. The fasteners allow attachment of the ruff to the camouflage cold-weather parka.
  16. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the ECWCS:
    1. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    2. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    3. Gloves, black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
    4. Military Police accessories (para 27-16).
    5. Neckgaiter (para 27-17).
    6. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
    7. Undergarments (para 27-28).
    8. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  17. Accouterments. The following insignia will be worn on the ECWCS (Gortex) parka.
    1. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
    2. Name-distinguishing tape (para 28-24).
  18. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment, unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 8: Hospital Duty Uniform Male

8-1. Authorization for wear

The male hospital duty uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all male officers in the Army Nurse Corps (ANC), the Army Medical Specialist Corps (AMSC), and by enlisted males with medical, dental, or veterinary military occupational specialties (MOSs). (See fig 8-1).

Figure 8-1. Hospital duty uniform, male

8-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. The fabric is white, durable-press cotton and polyester.
  2. Uniform composition. The male hospital duty uniform normally comprises the items listed below. However, the medical facility commander may authorize variations to this uniform, using clothing items listed in CTA 50-900 and CTA 8-100.
    1. Smock, men’s, medical assistant’s. The smock is short-sleeved with a left breast pocket, a front button closure, and a straight-cut bottom.
    2. Smock, physician’s white. The smock is knee-length with a front button closure, and upper and lower pockets.
    3. Trousers, men’s, medical assistant’s. The trousers have four pockets (two slash pockets in front, and two patch pockets in back), with a button closure on the left side, a front zipper closure, and belt loops.
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the male hospital duty uniform.
    1. Belt, web, with open-faced black buckle (paras 27-2 and ).
    2. Coats.
  4. Black, all weather (para 27-8).
  5. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (BDU field jacket) (para 3-2(3)).
  6. Gloves, black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
  7. Headgear.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, service, cold weather, AG 489 (only with the black all-weather coat) (para 27-5).
  8. Scarves.
    1. Black (with black overcoat only)(para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (with field jacket only) (para 27-21).
  9. Shoes.
    1. Oxford, black (para 27-23).
    2. Oxford, white (para 27-23).
  10. Socks.
    1. Black, dress (para 27-24).
    2. White (para 27-24).
  11. Sweater, white unisex cardigan (para 27-26).
  12. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  13. Undershirt, white (para 27-28).
  14. Windbreaker, black (para 27-30).
  15. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the medical facility commander for wear within the medical treatment facility, according to CTA 50-900 or CTA 8-100.
  16. Classification. The hospital duty uniform is an organizational issue utility uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

8-3. Occasions for wear

The male hospital duty uniform is worn on duty in Army health care facilities, as prescribed by the medical commander. The hospital duty uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. The commander may authorize medical personnel to wear this uniform off post when providing support for activities in the civilian community, such as parades or ceremonies. (See para 2-6 for other exceptions to this policy.)

8-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on the male hospital duty uniforms.

  1. Branch insignia, non-subdued (para 28-12).
  2. Grade insignia, non-subdued (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  3. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  4. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  5. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

8-5. General guidelines

  1. Enlisted and Army Nurse Corps personnel. When prescribed for wear, the hospital duty uniform is worn with the medical assistant’s smock worn over the white trousers. Officer personnel wear white oxford shoes and white socks with these uniforms. Wear of the white oxfords and white socks by enlisted personnel is optional. Enlisted personnel will otherwise wear black oxford shoes and black socks with this uniform. Personnel may wear the optional purchase, black windbreaker with the uniform, except in formation (para 27-30). The optional purchase, white unisex cardigan is authorized for wear as an outer garment while on duty. Soldiers may wear the white unisex cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; when outdoors, they will wear the cardigan buttoned. Soldiers will wear the collar of the smock outside the sweater so rank is visible.
  2. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001 (see para 3-5 for wear policy). When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Soldiers may wear the black scarf and AG 489 cold-weather cap with the black all-weather coat. Depending upon the uniform fabric, starching and pressing may damage the uniform material, so soldiers must exercise caution in this matter.
  3. Warrant officers and commissioned officers. Warrant or commissioned officers of the medical, dental, veterinary, medical service, or medical specialty corps may wear the physician’s white smock over either the service or utility uniforms, in a medical care facility, or on duty as directed by the commander of the medical facility.
  4. Precautionary wear restrictions. Personnel should exercise caution because some of the materials used in these uniforms are inappropriate for use in areas where flammable gases are employed. Commanders will prohibit the wear of polyester hospital duty uniforms in flammable, anesthetizing locations and mixed facilities (as defined in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards), or in any area where easily ignitable substances are present, such as anesthetizing agents. This restriction does not apply to inhalation therapy areas where oxygen is administered, providing that easily ignitable substances such as ether, cyclopropane, alcohol, acetone, oils, greases, or lotions are not present. The presence of such flammable substances in oxygen-enriched atmospheres is prohibited by NFPA standards.
  5. Figure 8-1 shows the hospital duty uniform for males.

Chapter 9: Hospital Duty and Maternity Uniforms Female

9-1. Authorization for wear

The female hospital duty uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all female officers in the ANC and the AMSC, and by enlisted females with a medical, dental, or veterinary MOS. The term “hospital duty uniform” used throughout this chapter refers to both the hospital duty and hospital duty maternity uniforms. (See figs 9-1 and 9-2.)

Figure 9-1. Hospital duty dress, with beret

Figure 9-2. Hospital duty pantsuit

9-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. The fabric is white cotton or polyester.
  2. Uniform composition. The female hospital duty uniform normally comprises the following items; however, the commander may authorize variations to this uniform using clothing items authorized in CTA 50-900 and CTA 8-100.
    1. Dress, maternity, white. The dress is any plain, white, unadorned commercial design, in an easy-care, durable-press and soil-release material, with wing collars suitable for placement of rank and branch insignia, as prescribed. Fabric content must comply with NFPA standards. Any closure method is acceptable, but it may not cause safety hazards or degradation of appearance.
    2. Dress, women’s. The dress will be of an approved specification or pattern. It is knee-length with short sleeves and has a front button closure system, wing-tip collars, and a belt (see fig 9-1).
    3. Slacks and tunic, maternity, white. The slacks and tunic may be any plain, white, unadorned commercial design. The fabric is an easy-care, durable-press, and soil-release material, with wing collars suitable for placement of rank and branch insignia, as prescribed. Fabric content must comply with NFPA standards. Any closure method is acceptable, but it may not cause safety hazards or degradation of appearance.
    4. Smock, physician’s, white. The smock is knee-length, with a front button closure and upper and lower pockets.
    5. Uniform, women’s, tunic and pants, hospital duty. The uniform will be of an approved specification or pattern. The tunic is an over-the-hip style with winged collars, short sleeves, and side pockets; the pants are straight-legged (see fig 9-2).
    6. Headgear. The beret is authorized for wear with the hospital duty uniforms when outside the medical treatment facility (see para 3-5).
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the female hospital duty uniform.
    1. Coats.
  4. Black, all weather (para 27-8).
  5. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (BDU field jacket) (para 3-2(3)).
  6. Gloves, black leather shell, with inserts (para 27-12).
  7. Handbags.
    1. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
    2. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  8. Headgear.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, service, cold weather, AG 489 (only with the black all-weather coat) (para 27-5).
  9. Scarves.
    1. Black (with black overcoat only) (para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (with field jacket only) (para 27-21).
  10. Shoes.
    1. Oxford, black (para 27-23).
    2. Oxford, white (para 27-23).
  11. Socks.
    1. Black (para 27-24).
    2. White (para 27-24).
  12. Stockings.
    1. Sheer (para 27-24).
    2. White (para 27-24).
  13. Sweater, white unisex cardigan (para 27-26).
  14. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  15. Windbreaker (para 27-30).
  16. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the medical facility commander for wear within the medical treatment facility, according to CTA 50-900 or CTA 8-100.
  17. Classification. The hospital duty uniform is an organizational issue utility uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

9-3. Occasions for wear

The female hospital duty uniform is worn on duty in Army health care facilities, as prescribed by the medical commander. It is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. The commander may authorize medical personnel to wear this uniform off post when providing support for activities in the civilian community, such as parades or ceremonies. (See para 2-6 for other exceptions to this policy.)

9-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on the female hospital duty uniforms.

  1. Branch insignia, non-subdued (para 28-12).
  2. Grade insignia, non-subdued (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  3. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  4. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  5. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

9-5. General guidelines

  1. Basic uniform.
    1. Enlisted and officer ANC and AMSC personnel.
  2. The dress is worn when prescribed for wear. The length of the dress will be no longer than 2 inches below, or more than 1 inch above the bend in the back of the knee. The dress is worn with the belt at all times. Only the dome-shaped, white polyester shank-type buttons issued with the dress are authorized for wear on the belt (secured with safety pins on the back of the belt). The white maternity dress does not have a belt.
  3. The tunic-and-pants uniform is worn when prescribed for wear. The tunic is worn outside the pants.
  4. The following pertains to both the dress and the tunic-and-pants uniforms. Officers will wear the white oxford shoes and white stockings with these uniforms. Wear of the white oxford shoes and stockings by enlisted personnel is optional. Enlisted personnel will otherwise wear black oxford shoes and sheer stockings with the hospital duty dress, and the black oxford shoes with black socks when wearing the tunic-and-pants uniforms.
  5. Soldiers may wear the white unisex cardigan sweater as an outer garment with this uniform while on duty. Personnel may wear the white unisex cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; when outdoors, all except pregnant soldiers will wear the cardigan buttoned. Personnel will wear the collar of the dress or tunic outside the sweater so the rank is visible. The black windbreaker is authorized for wear with the tunic-and-pants uniform and the hospital duty dress (para 27-30). The other outer garments listed in paragraph 9-2(1) also are authorized for wear with these uniforms.
  6. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001 (see para 3-5 for wear policy). When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Soldiers may wear the black scarf and AG 489 cold-weather cap with the black all-weather coat. Depending upon the uniform fabric, starching and pressing may damage the uniform material, so soldiers must exercise caution in this matter.
  7. Warrant officers and commissioned officers. The commander may authorize the wear of the physician’s white smock over the service or utility uniforms (except the hospital duty dress and tunic and pants) in a medical treatment facility.
  8. Issue. The issue of the hospital maternity uniform to hospital duty female personnel has no bearing on the issue of the Army green maternity service uniform (chap 17) or the maternity work uniform (chap 4).
  9. Precautionary wear restrictions. Personnel should exercise caution because some of the materials used in these uniforms are inappropriate for use in areas where flammable gases are employed. Commanders will prohibit the wear of hospital duty dresses and polyester pantsuits in flammable, anesthetizing locations and mixed facilities (as defined in NFPA standards), or in any area where easily ignitable substances are present, such as anesthetizing agents. This restriction does not apply to inhalation therapy areas where oxygen is administered, providing that easily ignitable substances such as ether, cyclopropane, alcohol, acetone, oils, greases, or lotions are not present. The presence of such flammable substances in oxygen-enriched atmospheres is prohibited by NFPA standards.

Chapter 10: Food Service Uniform Male

10-1. Authorization for wear

The male food service utility uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all enlisted soldiers in career management field (CMF) 92 who hold food service MOSs, when prescribed by CTA 50-900 and the commander. (See fig 10-1.)

Figure 10-1. Food service uniform, male

10-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition.
    1. White, cotton and polyester, durable press.
    2. Black, polyester, durable press.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. The male food service utility uniform comprises the following items:
  3. Smock, men’s, medical assistant’s (see para 8-2(1)).
  4. Trousers, men’s, medical assistant’s (see para 8-2(3)).
  5. The garrison food service supervisor uniform comprises the following items.
    1. Shirt, white dress. Commercial, short-sleeved shirt with a left chest pocket and a front button closure (local procurement according to CTA 50-900).
    2. Trousers, men’s, food service, black. Commercial straight-legged trousers with two front slash pockets, two back patch pockets, and a front zipper closure with belt loops (local procurement according to CTA 50-900).
  6. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the food service utility uniforms.
    1. Belt, web, with open-faced black buckle (food service uniform), and belt, web, with brass buckle (food service supervisor) (para 27-2).
    2. Coats.
  7. Black, all weather (para 27-8).
  8. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (BDU field jacket) (para 3-2(3)).
  9. Footwear.
    1. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    2. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  10. Gloves.
    1. Black leather shell with inserts (para 27-12).
    2. Black, leather, dress, unisex (para 27-12).
  11. Headgear.
    1. Beret, (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, service, cold weather, AG 489 (only with the black all-weather coat) (para 27-5).
  12. Scarves.
    1. Black (only with the black overcoat) (para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (only with the BDU jacket) (para 27-21).
  13. Socks.
    1. Black, cushion sole (worn with boots only) (para 27-24).
    2. Black, dress (para 27-24).
  14. Sweater, black unisex cardigan (para 27-26) and black pullover (para 27-26) (only with food service supervisor uniform).
  15. Sweater, white unisex cardigan (para 27-26) (only with food service utility uniform).
  16. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  17. Undershirts, white (para 27-28).
  18. Windbreaker (para 27-30).
  19. Smock, food inspector’s, and other organizational clothing and equipment as determined by the commander, according to CTA 50-900 and CTA 50-970.
  20. Classification. The food service utility and food service supervisor uniforms are organizationally issued utility uniforms. However, soldiers retain these uniforms for as long as they are assigned to food service duties. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

10-3. Occasions for wear

Enlisted soldiers in CMF 92 who hold food service MOSs wear the food service utility and food service supervisor uniforms on duty, when prescribed by the commander. The food service utility uniforms are not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. The commander may authorize food service personnel to wear these uniforms off post when providing support for activities in the civilian community, such as parades or ceremonies. (See para 2-6 for exceptions to this policy.) These uniforms are worn only in garrison and are not authorized for wear in the field.

10-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia are authorized for wear on the male food service uniforms.

  1. Grade insignia, non-subdued (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  2. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  3. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  4. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

10-5. General guidelines

  1. The food service uniform is worn with the smock tucked into the trousers. The commander may authorize exceptions to the prescribed wear of the smock for health and safety reasons. The black belt with black open-faced buckle is worn with this uniform. The food handler’s apron and food handler’s caps are worn only within the immediate vicinity of the dining facility. No insignia is worn on the food handler’s cap.
  2. The optional purchase, white unisex cardigan is authorized for wear as an outer garment with the food service uniform while on duty. However, soldiers may not wear the white cardigan when serving or preparing food. Soldiers may wear the white unisex cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; when outdoors, they will wear the cardigan buttoned. Soldiers will wear the collar of the smock outside the sweater so rank is visible. Soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat and the cold-weather camouflage coat (field jacket) as outer garments with these uniforms. When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive-green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Personnel may wear the optional purchase, black windbreaker (para 27-30), except in formation. Black oxford shoes or combat boots are worn with the food service uniforms, unless CTA 50-900 authorizes other footwear. Soldiers will not blouse the trousers when wearing boots. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001 (see para 3-5 for wear policy). Soldiers will wear the food handler’s cap only while in the dining facility.
  3. The food service supervisor may wear the white shirt, black trousers, black oxford shoes, and the beret, when authorized by the commander. The black windbreaker, black pullover and unisex cardigan sweaters, and the black all-weather coat are authorized for wear with this uniform. Food service supervisors may wear the black unisex cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; when outdoors, they will button the sweater. The black belt with brass buckle is worn with this uniform. The food inspector’s smock is authorized for wear with the food service supervisor uniform only while in the dining facility.
  4. The black scarf, black dress gloves, and the AG 489 cold-weather service cap are authorized for wear with the black all-weather coat, with the food service uniforms.
  5. Figure 10-1 shows the food service uniform for males.

Chapter 11: Food Service and Maternity Uniforms Female

11-1. Authorization for wear

The female food service utility uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by enlisted soldiers in CMF 92 who hold food service MOSs, when prescribed by CTA 50-900 and the commander. (See fig 11-1.)

Figure 11-1. Food service uniform, female

11-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition.
    1. White, cotton and polyester, durable press.
    2. Black, polyester, durable press.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. The female food service uniform comprises the following items (see chap 9).
  3. Dress, women’s, hospital duty, white.
  4. Uniform, tunic and pants, women’s, hospital duty, white.
  5. Dress, maternity, white.
  6. Slacks and tunic, maternity, white.
  7. Pantsuit, women’s, cotton/polyester, white.
  8. The garrison food service supervisor uniform comprises the following items.
    1. Blouse, women’s, food service, white. Commercial, short-sleeved blouse with a front button closure (local procurement according to CTA 50-900).
    2. Skirt, women’s food service, black (local procurement according to CTA 50-900).
    3. Slacks, women’s, food service, black (local procurement according to CTA 50-900).
  9. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the food service utility uniforms.
    1. Coats.
  10. Black, all weather (para 27-8).
  11. Coat, cold weather, woodland camouflage pattern (BDU field jacket) (para 3-2(3)).
  12. Footwear.
    1. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    2. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  13. Gloves.
    1. Black leather shell, with inserts (para 27-12).
    2. Black, leather, dress, unisex (para 27-12).
  14. Handbags.
    1. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
    2. Black, shoulder (27-13).
  15. Headgear.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Cap, service, cold weather, AG 489 (only with the black all-weather coat) (para 27-5).
  16. Scarves.
    1. Black (only with the black overcoat) (para 27-21).
    2. Olive- green 208 (only with the field jacket) (para 27-21).
  17. Socks.
    1. Black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
    2. Black, dress (para 27-24).
  18. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  19. Sweater, black unisex cardigan and black pullover (paras 27-26 and ) (only with the food service supervisor uniform).
  20. Sweater, white unisex cardigan (para 27-26) (only with the food service utility uniform).
  21. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  22. Windbreaker (para 27-30).
  23. Smock, food inspector’s, and other organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander, according to CTA 50-900 and CTA 50-970.
  24. Classification. The food service utility and food service supervisor uniforms are organizationally issued utility uniforms. However, soldiers retain these uniforms for as long as they are assigned to food service duties. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

11-3. Occasions for wear

Enlisted soldiers in CMF 92 who hold food service MOSs wear the food service utility uniform on duty, when prescribed by the commander. The food service utility uniforms are not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. The commander may authorize food service personnel to wear these uniforms off post when providing support for activities in the civilian community, such as parades or ceremonies. (See para 2-6 for other exceptions to this policy.) These uniforms are worn only in garrison and are not authorized for wear in the field.

11-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia are authorized for wear on the food service uniforms.

  1. Grade insignia, non-subdued (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  2. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  3. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  4. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

11-5. General guidelines

  1. The food handler’s apron and the food handler’s cap (CTA 50-970) are authorized for wear only within the immediate vicinity of the dining facility. No insignia is worn on the food handler’s cap. The optional purchase, white unisex cardigan is authorized for wear as an outer garment with the food service utility uniform while on duty. However, soldiers may not wear the white cardigan when serving or preparing food. Soldiers may wear the white unisex cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; when outdoors, with the exception of pregnant soldiers, they will wear the cardigan buttoned. Soldiers will wear the collar of the smock outside the sweater so rank is visible. Soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat and cold-weather camouflage coat (field jacket) as outer garments with these uniforms. When the cold-weather coat or other authorized cold-weather outer garments are worn, personnel may wear the olive green scarf and the black leather shell gloves, but they are not required to do so. Soldiers may wear the optional purchase, black windbreaker (para 27-30), except in formation.
  2. Black oxford shoes or combat boots are worn with the food service uniforms, unless other footwear is authorized by CTA 50-900. Soldiers will wear either black socks or sheer stockings with the black oxfords, with the pantsuit, or with the tunic with slacks. Sheer stockings are worn with the food service uniform dresses. The slacks are not bloused when wearing boots.
  3. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001 (see para 3-5 for wear policy). Soldiers may wear the food handler’s cap only while in the dining facility.
  4. The food service supervisor may wear the white blouse, black slacks or skirt, black oxford shoes, and the beret, when authorized by the commander. The black windbreaker, black pullover sweater, black unisex cardigan, and black all-weather coat are authorized for wear with this uniform. Food service supervisors may wear the black cardigan buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; outdoors, with the exception of pregnant soldiers, they must button the sweater. The food inspector’s smock is authorized for wear with the food service supervisor uniform only while in the dining facility.
  5. The black scarf, black dress gloves, and the AG 489 cold-weather service cap are authorized for wear with the black all weather-coat with the food service uniforms. Females may carry handbags with these uniforms, except when in formation.
  6. The issuance of the food service maternity uniform to female personnel has no bearing on the issuance of the Army green maternity service uniform (chap 17), or the maternity work uniform (chap 4).
  7. Figure 11-1 shows the food service uniform for females.

Chapter 12: Flight Uniforms

12-1. Authorization for wear

The Army flight uniform is authorized for year-round wear by flight crews, when prescribed by CTA 50-900 and the commander. (See fig 12-1.)

Figure 12-1. Flight uniform, with beret

12-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. The flight coverall fabric is a blend of 92 percent NOMEX, 5 percent Kevlar, and 3 percent static dissipative fiber, plain weave, sage green and tan 380 in color.
  2. Uniform composition. The flight uniform comprises the following items:
    1. One-piece organizational flight coverall. The coveralls are unlined, with a slide-fastener front closure, hook-and-pile fastener tape adjustments for the waist and sleeves, and a slide fastener on the bottom of each leg. There are two breast patch pockets, a combination utility and pencil pocket on the left sleeve, two thigh patch pockets, a knife pocket with lanyard on the left thigh, two lower-leg patch pockets, and a multiple pencil compartment pocket on the right lower-leg pocket. Except for the knife pocket, all pockets have slide-fastener closures.
    2. Gloves, flight. The gloves are of the four-finger and thumb type. The front of the hand and fingers are leather. An elastic take-up tab is used on the front of the wrist.
    3. Jacket, flight. The jacket has knitted cuffs and waistband, a front slide-fastener closure with an inside protective flap, a collar with a hook-and-pile tab closure, and diagonal side pockets with flaps. The left sleeve has a utility/pencil pocket. The jacket is fully lined.
  3. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with the flight uniform.
    1. Boots, combat leather, black (para 27-3).
    2. Headgear.
  4. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
  5. Cap, patrol (formerly BDU) (para 3-2(2)).
  6. Helmet, aviator.
  7. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  8. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  9. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  10. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  11. Gloves, flyer’s, LIN J67052.
  12. Classification. The flight uniform is an organizational issue uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

12-3. Occasions for wear

The flight uniform is worn on duty when flying, on standby awaiting flight, or as directed by the commander. The flight uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. (See para 2-6 for exceptions to this policy.)

12-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia are authorized for wear on the flight uniform.

  1. Grade insignia (para 12-5).
  2. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  3. Nameplate (para 12-5).
  4. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI), current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  5. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

12-5. General guidelines

  1. Flight coverall. The organizational flight uniform is for use by flight crews as prescribed in CTA 50-900. Alterations to the uniform are not authorized. The black leather combat boots and the flyer’s insulated boots (when authorized according to CTA 50-900) are the authorized footwear for the flight uniform. Personnel will not tuck the flight coverall into the boots. Soldiers will keep the sleeves down on the flight uniform during flight operations. The flight uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate. Flight jackets are worn only with the organizational flight uniform. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001. Soldiers will wear the beret when not performing flight duties, unless the commander has prescribed wear of the patrol cap, as described in chapter 3 of this regulation. (See para 3-5 for wear policy of the beret and the patrol cap.) Commanders may authorize other uniforms for wear during administrative flights.
  2. Insignia and accouterments.
    1. A 2-inch by 4-inch leather nameplate is attached to the 2-inch by 4-inch Velcro attachments affixed to the flight suit and jacket. This nameplate consists of -inch block style lettering in silver, with the appropriate crewmember’s badge on the first line, full name (first, middle initial, and last name) on the second line, and abbreviated rank and the words “U.S. Army” on the third line. The nameplate is provided at no expense to the soldier.
    2. The SSI is worn inch below the shoulder seam. Officer personnel will wear subdued embroidered insignia of grade on the shoulder of the organizational flight suit and flight jacket. The insignia is centered ? inch in from the shoulder seam. Chest insignia patches are not authorized.
    3. Local commanders may authorize all aviation personnel who are not authorized flight clothing to remove pin-on metal insignia from the work uniforms while engaged in maintenance activities near the aircraft.
    4. Local commanders may authorize the wear of solid baseball caps (when authorized in accordance with CTA 50-900) by aircraft and ground crewmembers as a safety and identification measure, while on the flight line or in the base operations area. Personnel will wear standard headgear outside this area. Soldiers will wear grade insignia on organizational baseball caps, in accordance with para 28-3. Commanders will provide the caps to soldiers at no expense.
  3. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment, unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.

Chapter 13: Combat Vehicle Crewman Uniform

13-1. Authorization for wear

The combat vehicle crewman (CVC) uniform is authorized for year-round wear by combat vehicle crewmen, when issued in accordance with CTA 50-900 and prescribed by the commander. (See fig 13-1.)

Figure 13-1. Combat vehicle crewman’s uniform

13-2. Composition and classification

  1. Material composition. The fabric is high-temperature resistant, anti-static treated, non-melting aramid blend, plain weave, OG-106 and tan 380 in color.
  2. Uniform composition.
    1. Coverall. The coverall is a one-piece design that has a front entry zippered closure, a drop seat, an extraction strap located at the upper back, and pockets located on the left sleeve, chest, right and left sides, right-left front hips, right-left upper thigh, and right-left lower legs. All pockets have slide-fastener closures. This is the only component produced in the tan 380, but it may be worn with OG-106 components.
    2. Jacket, cold weather. The jacket is single-breasted with a front slide-fastener closure, and an inside protective flap. The back has a yoke-and-retrieval strap opening with a hook-and-pile closure. The left sleeve has a utility and pencil pocket, and the sleeves have elbow patches. The cuffs and waistband are rib knit. The jacket is fully lined with quilted, flame-resistant batting material. (See fig 13-2.)

Figure 13-2. Jacket, cold weather

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are normally worn with these uniforms.
    1. Balaclava hood, CVC, LIN H46881, CTA 50-900.
    2. Bib, overalls, LIN P37820.
    3. Body armor, ballistic undergarment, LIN 80592N.
    4. Boots, combat, leather, black (para 27-3).
    5. Gloves, CVC, cold weather, LIN C67081.
    6. Gloves, CVC, summer, LIN G70780.
    7. Headgear.
  2. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
  3. Cap, patrol (formerly BDU) (para 3-2(2)).
  4. Helmet, CVC.
  5. Socks, black, cushion sole (para 27-24).
  6. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  7. Undershirt, brown (para 27-28).
  8. Organizational clothing and equipment, as determined by the commander, in accordance with CTA 50-900.
  9. Classification. The CVC uniform is an organizational issue uniform. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

13-3. Occasions for wear

The CVC uniform is worn on duty when directed by the commander. It is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except in transit between an individual’s quarters and duty station. (See para 2-6 for exceptions to this policy.) These uniforms are not intended for wear as all-purpose uniforms when other uniforms are more appropriate.

13-4. Insignia and accouterments

The following insignia and accouterments are authorized for wear on these uniforms.

  1. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7); attachment (para 13-5).
  2. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  3. Nametape (para 28-24); attachment (para 13-5).
  4. U.S. Army tape (para 28-24); attachment (para 13-5).
  5. Subdued shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization (para 28-16(2)).
  6. Organizational flash (para 28-31).

13-5. General guidelines

  1. Basic uniform. When issued, all combat vehicle crewmen wear the CVC uniform whenever they are operating their vehicles. Alterations to the uniform are not authorized. The black leather combat boot is the authorized footwear for wear with the CVC uniform. Soldiers will not tuck the uniform into the boots. The only outer garment authorized for wear with the CVC uniform is the cold-weather jacket. The black beret became the basic headgear for this uniform on 14 June 2001. The beret will be worn when the CVC helmet is not worn, unless the commander has prescribed wear of the patrol cap, as described in chapter 3 of this regulation. (See para 3-5 for wear policy of the beret and the patrol cap.)
  2. Wear of insignia.
    1. The U.S. Army tape is worn horizontal to the ground, approximately inch up from the outside zipper seam on the left breast. The nametape is worn on the right side, in line with the U.S. Army tape. The subdued sew-on grade insignia is worn centered inch above the nametape.
    2. On the cold-weather jacket, the nametape and U.S. Army tape are worn horizontal to the ground, approximately 1 inches above the top of the pocket flaps.
    3. Commanders will provide, and have attached, the subdued sew-on grade insignia, nametape, U.S. Army tape, and shoulder sleeve insignia, without cost to enlisted personnel.
  3. Commanders may authorize the use of a camouflage personal hydration system only in the following situations: in a field environment, in high-heat areas, or on work details. Soldiers will not carry hydration systems in a garrison environment, unless the commander has authorized it for one of the situations described above. Soldiers will not let the drinking tube hang from their mouths when the device is not in use.
  4. Figures 13-1 and 13-2 show the basic uniform and the cold-weather jacket.

Chapter 14: Physical Fitness Uniform

14-1. Authorization for wear

The physical fitness uniform (PFU) is authorized for year-round wear by all personnel, when prescribed by the commander. The improved PFU (IPFU) replaces the PFU. Soldiers may wear the PFU until 30 Sep 2003; mandatory possession for the IPFU is 1 Oct 2003. (See fig 14-1 for authorized variations of the IPFU and figure 14-2 for the PFU.)

Figure 14-1. Improved physical fitness uniform variations

Figure 14-1. Improved physical fitness uniform variationsContinued

Figure 14-2. Physical fitness uniform

14-2. Composition and classification

  1. The PFU consists of the following components.
    1. T-shirt, athletic, gray.
    2. Trunks, general purpose, gray.
    3. Sweatpants, gray.
    4. Sweatshirt, hooded, gray, with zipper.
    5. Cap, knit, black.
  2. The IPFU consists of the following components.
    1. Jacket, running, gray and black.
    2. Pants, running, black.
    3. Trunks, running, black, moisture-wicking.
    4. T-shirt, gray, short sleeve, moisture-wicking.
    5. T-shirt, gray, long sleeve, moisture-wicking.
    6. Cap, knit, black.

14-3. Accessories

  1. Commanders may authorize the wear of commercial running shoes, calf-length or ankle-length, plain white socks with no logos, gloves, reflective belts or vests, long underwear, and other items appropriate to the weather conditions and type of activity. If soldiers wear long underwear or other similar items, they must conceal them from view with the hooded sweatshirt and sweat pants when wearing the PFU, or the running jacket and pants if wearing the IPFU.
  2. Soldiers are authorized to wear commercially purchased gray or black spandex shorts under the PFU or IPFU shorts. The length of the shorts must end above the knee or higher. The commercial shorts must be plain, with no logos, patterns, or obtrusive markings. Soldiers are not required to buy the spandex shorts.

14-4. Occasions for wear

The PFU and the IPFU are authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, when authorized by the commander. Soldiers may wear all or part of the PFU or IPFU with civilian attire off the installation, when authorized by the commander.

14-5. Insignia

The only insignia authorized for wear on the PFU or IPFU is the physical fitness badge. When the physical fitness badge is worn, it is sewn on the upper left front side of the PFU and IPFU T-shirt, and the PFU sweatshirt. On the IPFU running jacket, the insignia is sewn centered inch above the word “Army.” See AR 600-8-22 for criteria for wear of the physical fitness badge.

14-6. General guidelines

  1. Soldiers may not mix or match PFU and IPFU items. When soldiers wear either the PFU or IPFU as a complete uniform, they will keep the sleeves down on the sweatshirt or jacket, the legs down on the pants, and they will tuck the T-shirt inside the trunks. Soldiers may not roll or push up the sleeves of the PFU sweatshirt or the IPFU jacket. Soldiers may wear the sleeves of the PFU sweatshirt cuffed or uncuffed; they may not cuff the IPFU jacket sleeves. Soldiers will wear the black knit cap pulled down snugly on the head, with the bottom edge of the cap folded up; soldiers will not roll the edge of the cap. A similar, commercially designed black knit cap is authorized for wear. There are no restrictions on the combination of IPFU items worn, unless the commander has prescribed a particular combination for formation. Standards of wear and appearance specified in paragraphs 1-7 and 1-8 and of this regulation apply at all times.
  2. The PFU and the IPFU are clothing bag items. Each element of the PFU and IPFU is identified with a national stock number (NSN) and a Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) contract number printed on a label and sewn into the garment. If the label does not contain this information, the garment is not the authorized garment.
  3. Commanders should expect both uniforms (PFU and IPFU) in their formations until all soldiers acquire the IPFU by the mandatory possession date.
  4. Pregnant soldiers will wear the PFU or IPFU until the uniform becomes too small or uncomfortable. Pregnant soldiers are authorized to wear the T-shirt outside the trunks. At no time will commanders require pregnant soldiers to purchase a larger PFU or IPFU in order to accommodate the pregnancy. When the uniform becomes too small or uncomfortable, pregnant soldiers may wear equivalent civilian workout clothes.

Part Three Service Uniforms

Chapter 15: Army Green Service Uniform Male

15-1. Authorization for wear

The class A and B Army green uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all male personnel. The class A service uniform is an optional dress uniform for all male enlisted personnel when worn with the white shirt and bow tie. The Army green dress uniform, with white shirt and bow tie, is equivalent to the Army blue and white uniforms. (For the officer Army green service uniform, see fig 15-1; for officer and enlisted berets, see fig 15-2 and 15-3; for garrison cap, officer, see fig 15-4 ; for Army green uniform, enlisted, see fig 15-5; for garrison cap, officer, see fig 15-5, for garrison cap, enlisted, see fig 15-6; and for shirt and tie options with class B Army green uniforms, see fig 15-7, 15-8, and 15-9.)

Figure 15-1. Army green service uniform, officer

Figure 15-2. Beret, officer

Figure 15-3. Beret, enlisted

Figure 15-4. Garrison cap, officers

Figure 15-5. Army green uniform, enlisted

Figure 15-6. Garrison cap, enlisted

Figure 15-7. Class B Army green uniform, long-sleeved shirt and tie

Figure 15-8. Class B Army green uniform, short-sleeved shirt and tie

15-2. Composition

  1. The class A green service uniform comprises the Army green coat and trousers, an Army green (AG) shade 415 short- or long-sleeved shirt, and a black four-in-hand necktie. (For accessories and other items authorized for wear on the class A green service uniform, see para 15-10.)
  2. The class B green uniform comprises the Army green trousers and AG shade 415 short- or long-sleeved shirt. Soldiers will wear a four-in-hand necktie with the long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt when it is worn without the class A coat, as an outer garment. (See para 15-10 for accessories and other items authorized for wear with the class B uniform.)
  3. The Army green dress uniform (authorized for enlisted personnel only) comprises the Army green coat and trousers, a commercial long-sleeved white shirt, and a black four-in-hand tie (before retreat) or a black bow tie (after retreat). The black beret is authorized for wear with this uniform. When the enlisted Army green dress uniform is worn for evening social occasions (after retreat), headgear is not required. Combat boots and organizational items, such as brassards and military police (MP) accessories, are not authorized for wear with the Army green dress uniform. All other accessories and insignia that are authorized for wear with the class A service uniform are authorized for wear on the Army green dress uniform (see para 15-10).

15-3. Classification

The Army green service uniform is a clothing bag issue item. The Army green dress uniform is an optional dress uniform for enlisted personnel when worn with a white shirt and black four-in-hand tie (before retreat) or black bow tie (after retreat). The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

15-4. Occasions for wear

  1. The Army green service uniform (class A) and authorized variations (class B) are authorized for wear by all male personnel when on duty, off duty, or during travel. These uniforms also are acceptable for informal social functions after retreat, unless the host prescribes other uniforms.
  2. The following are appropriate occasions for enlisted personnel to wear the Army green dress uniform.
    1. At social functions of a private or official nature, either before or after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions. Otherwise, it is not authorized for travel.
    2. When designated by the host.

15-5. Materials

  1. Coat and trousers. The coat and trousers will be made of the same material and shade.
    1. Polyester/wool serge, 11.8 ounce (standard issue fabric), AG shade 489.
    2. Polyester/wool gabardine, 10.6 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 489.
    3. Texturized woven polyester, 10.1 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 491.
    4. Polyester/wool elastique, 16.0 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 489.
  2. Headgear.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Garrison cap, male personnel. The material may be any of the materials listed for the coat and trousers in 15-5a, above.

15-6. Coat, Army green

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The coat is a single-breasted, peak-lapel, four-button coat extending below the crotch, fitting easily over the chest and shoulders, with a slight draped effect in the front and back. The coat is fitted slightly at the waist, conforming to body shape without tightness and with no prominent flare.
  3. Coat sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers. The sleeve has a band of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid 1 inches wide, sewn on each sleeve with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    2. Other officers. The sleeve has a band of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid inch wide, sewn on each sleeve with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The sleeve is plain.

15-7. Trousers, Army green

  1. Design. The trousers will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The trousers are straight legged without cuffs, and with side and hip pockets. The left hip pocket has a buttonhole tab and button.
  3. Trouser leg ornamentation. Ornamental braid is sewn on each outside seam of the trouser leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the trouser leg, as follows.
    1. General officers. Each trouser leg has two -inch wide black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braids sewn inch apart.
    2. Other officers. Each leg has one braid, 1 inches in width, made of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The trouser leg is plain.

15-8. Shirt, long- and short-sleeved

Figure 15-9. Class B Army green uniform, short-sleeved shirt without tie

  1. The clothing bag (issue) shirt is a pre-cured durable press, 65/35 polyester and cotton broadcloth shirt, AG shade 415, in short- and long-sleeved versions. (See figs 15-7, 15-8, and 15-9.) The shirt is a dress type with shoulder loops, a seven-button front, and two pleated pockets with button-down flaps.
  2. Soldiers are authorized to wear the optional purchase polyester/ wool short-sleeved (AG shade 469) and long-sleeved (AG shade 428) shirts. In accordance with care instructions provided on the shirts, soldiers may not starch or bleach the AG shades 415, 428, or 469 shirts.
  3. Soldiers are authorized to wear the short- and long-sleeved shirts with the class A coat, black unisex pullover and cardigan sweaters, and the windbreaker.
    1. Soldiers must wear a black four-in-hand necktie when wearing the short- or long-sleeved shirt with the class A coat, or when wearing the long-sleeved shirt as an outer garment without the class A coat. They have the option of wearing a tie when the short-sleeved shirt is worn as an outer garment.
    2. Soldiers have the option of wearing a tie when they wear the short- or long-sleeved shirts with the pullover sweater or cardigan sweaters. If a tie is worn with the pullover or cardigan sweaters, soldiers will wear the collar of the shirt inside the sweater. If no tie is worn with the pullover sweater, the collar is worn outside. If no tie is worn with the cardigan sweater, soldiers may wear the collar inside or outside the sweater. Soldiers may wear the cardigan sweater buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors, but they must button it when outdoors.

15-9. Headgear

  1. Beret (para 3-2(1)). (See figs 15-2 and 15-3.)
  2. Garrison cap, Army green. (See figs 15-4 and 15-6.)
    1. Design. The cap will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
    2. Ornamental braid. Garrison cap braid refers to the piping that is secured to the tip edge of the curtain of the garrison cap, and that is used for additional identification purposes. For junior and senior ROTC cadets, the cap has a cord edge braid of the same material as the cap, in AG shade 489 or 491.
    3. Wear. The beret became the standard headgear for class A and B Army green service uniforms, and the enlisted Army green dress uniform, on 14 June 2001.
    4. Proper wear position.
  3. See para 3-5 for wear policy on the beret.
  4. The garrison cap is worn with the front vertical crease of the cap centered on the forehead in a straight line with the nose, with the front lower portion of the cap approximately 1 inch above the eyebrows (approximately the width of the first two fingers). The cap is placed on the head in such a manner that the front and rear vertical creases and the top edge of the crown form unbroken lines in silhouette, and so the ridge of the cap is parallel to the ground while standing at attention. Personnel will not crush or shape the crown of the cap to form peaks at the top front or top rear of the cap.

15-10. Items normally worn with the Army green uniform

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are worn with the Army green uniform:
    1. Belt, black web, with brass tip (para 27-2).
    2. Boots, combat, leather, black (only when bloused trousers are authorized; not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-3).
    3. Buckle, solid brass (para 27-2).
    4. Buttons (para 27-4).
    5. Cap, cold-weather, AG shade 489 (only when wearing the black all-weather coat or black windbreaker) (para 27-5).
    6. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    7. Coat, black all-weather (para 27-8).
    8. Gloves, black, leather, unisex, dress (only when worn with the class A, Army enlisted green dress uniform, black all-weather coat, or windbreaker) (para 27-12).
    9. Hat, drill sergeant (not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-14).
    10. Judge’s apparel (para 27-15).
    11. Military police accessories (not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-16).
    12. Neckties.
  2. Black, bow (only with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-19).
  3. Black, four-in-hand (para 27-19).
  4. Scarf, black (only with black all-weather coat or windbreaker) (para 27-21).
  5. Shirt, white (only with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-22).
  6. Shoes, oxford, black, and overshoes (paras 27-23 and 27-20).
  7. Socks.
    1. Black, cushion sole (worn with boots only) (para 27-24).
    2. Black, dress (para 27-24).
  8. Sweater, unisex cardigan, black (para 27-26).
  9. Sweater, pullover, black (para 27-26).
  10. Undershirt, white (para 27-28).
  11. Windbreaker, black (only with class B uniform) (para 27-30).
  12. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army green uniform (class A and B) and the enlisted Army green dress uniform. Note the following exceptions:
    1. Aiguillette, service (officers only) (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-25).
    2. Brassards (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 28-29).
    3. Branch of service scarves (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 28-20).
    4. Fourragere/lanyards (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 29-11).
    5. Distinctive items for infantry personnel (para 28-30).
    6. Branch insignia (not authorized on the class B uniform) (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ).
    7. U.S. insignia (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-4).
    8. Insignia of grade (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
    9. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
    10. Distinctive unit insignia (DUI) (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform and the class B uniform) (para 28-22).
    11. Regimental distinctive insignia (RDI) (para 28-23).
    12. Combat leaders identification (not authorized on the class B uniform or enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 28-21).
    13. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
    14. Shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization, full color (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-16).
    15. Shoulder sleeve insignia, former wartime service, full color (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-17).
    16. Nameplate (para 28-24).
    17. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
    18. Airborne background trimming (para 28-31).
    19. Overseas service bars (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-28).
    20. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only; not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-27).
    21. Decorations and service medal ribbons (soldiers may not wear miniature medals on the enlisted Army green dress uniform; they may wear full-size or miniature medals on the class B uniform) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
    22. Unit awards (para 29-11).
    23. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill) (cloth special skill and marksmanship badges and tabs are not authorized on the class B uniform; full, miniature, and dress miniature badges are authorized on the class B uniform) (paras 29-13, 29-16, and 29-18).
    24. Foreign badges (para 29-19).
  13. Insignia authorized for wear with the class B uniform.
    1. Same as paragraph 15-10, except that the distinctive unit insignia (DUI), branch and U.S. insignia, sew-on insignia, and combat leaders identification are not authorized for wear.
    2. The DUI is authorized for wear on the black pullover sweater. If no DUI is authorized, then the RDI is worn (para 28-23(1)). Recruiters will wear the recruiting badge in lieu of the DUI or RDI.

15-11. General guidelines

  1. The Army green service uniforms are intended for wear during most duty, non-field, or utility occasions, and for travel and off-duty purposes. While both the class A and B uniforms are authorized for year-round wear, the appropriate uniform is worn based on weather conditions, duties, and the formality of the occasion. When a specific service uniform is not prescribed for formations or other occasions when uniformity in appearance is not required, soldiers may wear the class A or any of the variations of the class B uniform, with the accessories authorized for these uniforms.
  2. Soldiers will not wear those awards and decorations on the AG shade 415 shirt that they cannot wear properly because of size or configuration. Commanders will not require the wear of optional items, such as windbreakers or sweaters, unless such items are provided to the soldier without cost.
  3. Soldiers may purchase and wear the Army green service uniform in any of the authorized fabrics listed in paragraph 15-5. However, individuals who purchase uniforms or uniform items from commercial sources are responsible for ensuring that the items conform to military specifications, or are manufactured in accordance with the procedures prescribed by the uniform quality control program (see chap 2 for details). Only those alterations authorized by AR 700-84 and TM 10-227 are authorized. General fitting instructions for these uniforms are provided in chapter 1 of this regulation. Soldiers will wear these uniforms with the shirt tucked into the trousers so that the shirt edge is aligned with the front fly opening, so the outside edge of the belt buckle forms a straight “gig line.” Only soldiers authorized to wear the tan, green, or maroon berets, those assigned to Air Assault coded positions, and MPs performing MP duties may wear bloused (tucked-in or by the use of blousing rubbers/bands) trousers with black leather combat boots. Figures 15-1 through 15-9 show the class A and B Army green service uniforms and authorized headgear.

Chapter 16: Army Green Service Uniform Female

16-1. Authorization for wear

The class A and B Army green uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all female personnel. The class A service uniform is an optional dress uniform for all female enlisted personnel when worn with the skirt, a white shirt, and the neck tab. The Army green dress uniform, with white shirt and neck tab, is equivalent to the Army blue and white uniforms. (For the Army green uniform with slacks, officer, see fig 16-1; for the garrison cap, officer, see fig 16-2; for the beret, officer, see fig 16-3; for the beret, enlisted, see fig 16-4; for the Army green uniform with skirt, enlisted, see fig 16-5; for the garrison cap, enlisted, see fig 16-6; and for the class B variations of the Army green uniform, female, see fig 16-7.)

Figure 16-1. Army green uniform with slacks, officer

Figure 16-2. Garrison cap, officer

Figure 16-3. Berets, officer

Figure 16-4. Beret, enlisted

Figure 16-5. Army green uniform with skirt, enlisted

Figure 16-6. Garrison cap, enlisted

Figure 16-7. Class B variations of the Army green uniform, female

Figure 16-7. Class B variations of the Army green uniform, femaleContinued

16-2. Composition

  1. The class A green service uniform consists of the Army green coat, skirt or slacks, an AG shade 415 short- or long- sleeved tuck-in shirt, and a black neck tab. (For accessories and other items authorized for wear on the class A green service uniform see para 16-11.)
  2. The class B green uniform consists of the Army green skirt or slacks and an AG shade 415 long- or short- sleeved tuck-in shirt. Soldiers will wear a black neck tab with the long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt when it is worn without the class A coat, as an outer garment. (See para 16-11 for accessories and other items authorized for wear with the class B uniform.)
  3. The Army green dress uniform (authorized for enlisted personnel only) consists of the Army green coat and skirt, white shirt with black neck tab, and black service pumps. The black beret is authorized for wear with this uniform. When the enlisted Army green dress uniform is worn for evening social occasions (after retreat), headgear is not required. Combat boots, oxford shoes, and organizational items, such as brassards and MP accessories, are not authorized for wear with the enlisted Army green dress uniform. All other accessories and insignia that are authorized for wear with the class A service uniform are authorized for wear with the enlisted Army green dress uniform (see para 16-11 below).

16-3. Classification

The Army green service uniform is a clothing bag issue item. The Army green dress uniform is an optional dress uniform for enlisted personnel when worn with the skirt and white shirt with black neck tab. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

16-4. Occasions for wear

  1. The Army green service uniform (class A) and authorized variations (class B) are authorized for wear by all female personnel when on duty, off duty, or during travel. These uniforms also are acceptable for informal social functions after retreat, unless the host prescribes other uniforms.
  2. The following are appropriate occasions for enlisted personnel to wear the Army green dress uniform.
    1. At social functions of a private or official nature either before or after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions. Otherwise, it is not authorized for travel.
    2. When designated by the host.

16-5. Materials

  1. The mandatory date for possession of the materials described in paragraph 16-5, below, is extended until 1 Oct 2003. Until that time, females are authorized to wear the green service uniform components in AG shades 344 (poly/wool) and 434 (polyester).
  2. Coat, slacks, and skirt. The coat, slacks, and skirt will be made of the same material and shade.
    1. Polyester/wool serge, 11.8 ounce (standard-issue fabric), AG shade 489.
    2. Polyester/wool gabardine, 10.6 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 489.
    3. Texturized woven polyester, 10.1 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 491.
    4. Polyester/wool elastique, 16.0 ounce (optional purchase fabric), AG shade 489.
  3. Headgear.
    1. Beret (para 3-2(1)).
    2. Garrison cap, female personnel. The material may be any of the materials listed for the coat, slacks, and skirt in paragraph 16-5, above.

16-6. Coat, Army green

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The coat is a single-breasted, four-button, hip-length coat, with two slanted, flap front pockets, button-down shoulder loops, a notched collar, and side-body construction.
  3. Coat sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers. The sleeve has a band of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid 1 inches wide, sewn on each sleeve with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    2. Other officers. The sleeve has a band of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid inch wide, sewn on each sleeve with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The sleeve is plain.

16-7. Slacks, Army green

  1. Design. The slacks will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description.
    1. The slacks are straight legged, have a zipper front closure on the center front with a button fly tab, and two side pockets. These slacks are authorized for wear until 30 September 2003.
    2. Newly designed slacks replace the older style as of 1 October 2003. The newer design incorporates belt loops and a non-slip waistband. When wearing the slacks with belt loops with the tuck-in versions of the AG shade 415 blouse, personnel will wear a 1-inch black web belt with brass tip, and a 1?; inch yellow brass buckle. Soldiers are not required to wear a belt when wearing the new style slacks with the overblouse version of the AG shade 415 blouse.
  3. Slack leg ornamentation. Ornamental braid is sewn on each outside seam of the slack leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the slack leg, as follows:
    1. General officers. Each slack leg has two -inch-wide black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braids sewn inch apart.
    2. Other officers. Each leg has one braid, 1 inch wide, made of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The slack leg is plain.

16-8. Skirt, Army green

  1. Design. The skirt will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description.
    1. The skirt is knee length, slightly flared, with a waistband and zipper closure on the left side. This skirt is authorized for wear until 30 September 2003.
    2. A newly designed skirt replaces the older style, as of 1 October 2003. The new design skirt is tapered and incorporates a non-slip waistband, back zipper closure, back open (kick) pleat, two darts each in the front and back; it is fully lined.

16-9. Shirts, long- and short-sleeved

  1. The clothing bag (issue) shirt is a pre-cured, durable press, 65/35 polyester and cotton broadcloth shirt, AG shade 415, in short- and long-sleeved versions. The shirt is a tuck-in design with front princess seams, a convertible collar, and shoulder loops. The collar and shoulder loops have fusible interlinings, and the collar has stays.
  2. Optional purchase shirts. Soldiers are authorized to wear the optional purchase polyester/wool (AG shade 469) and polyester/cotton (AG shade 415) short- and long-sleeved overblouse shirts. This shirt is a semi-fitted, hip-length, overblouse style shirt with front princess seams, and a three-piece back. The shirt has shoulder loops, a convertible collar, and a six-button front. The collar and shoulder loops have fusible interlinings and the collar has stays. In accordance with care instructions provided on the shirts, soldiers may not starch or bleach the AG shades 415 or 469 shirts.
  3. Soldiers are authorized to wear the short- and long-sleeved shirts with the class A coat, black unisex pullover and cardigan sweaters, and the windbreaker.
    1. Soldiers must wear the black neck tab when wearing the short- or long-sleeved shirt with the class A coat, or when wearing the long-sleeved shirt as an outer garment (without the class A coat). Soldiers have the option of wearing the neck tab with the short-sleeved shirt when it is worn as an outer garment.
    2. Soldiers have the option of wearing a neck tab when they wear the short- or long-sleeved shirts with the pullover sweater or cardigan sweaters. If a neck tab is worn with the pullover or cardigan sweaters, soldiers will wear the collar of the shirt inside the sweater. If no neck tab is worn with the pullover sweater, the collar is worn outside. If no neck tab is worn with the cardigan sweater, soldiers may wear the collar inside or outside the sweater. Soldiers may wear the cardigan sweater buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors, but they must button it when outdoors.

16-10. Headgear

  1. Beret (para 3-2(1)). (See figs 16-3 and 16-4.)
  2. Garrison cap, Army green. (See figs 16-2 and 16-6.)
    1. Design. The cap will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
    2. Ornamental braid. Garrison cap braid refers to the piping that is secured to the tip edge of the curtain of the garrison cap and that is used for additional identification purposes. For junior and senior ROTC cadets, the cap has a cord edge braid of the same material as the cap, in AG shade 489 or 491.
    3. Wear. The beret became the standard headgear for class A and B Army green service uniforms, and the enlisted Army green dress uniform, on 14 June 2001.
    4. Proper wear position.
  3. See para 3-5 for wear policy on the beret.
  4. The garrison cap is worn with the front vertical crease of the cap centered on the forehead, with the front lower portion of the cap approximately 1 inch above the eyebrows (approximately the width of the first two fingers). The top of the cap is opened to cover the crown of the head. The bottom of the rear vertical crease will fit snugly to the back of the head. Hair will not be visible on the forehead below the front bottom edge of the cap.

16-11. Items normally worn with the Army green uniform

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are worn with the Army green uniform.
    1. Belt, black web, 1-inch, with brass tip (para 27-2).
    2. Boots, combat, leather, black (only when bloused slacks are authorized; not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-3).
    3. Buckle, solid brass, 1?; inch (para 27-2).
    4. Buttons (para 27-4).
    5. Cap, service, cold weather, AG shade 489 (only when wearing the black all-weather coat or black windbreaker) (para 27-5).
    6. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    7. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
    8. Gloves, black, leather, unisex, dress (only when worn with the class A, enlisted Army green dress uniform, black all-weather coat, or windbreaker) (para 27-12).
    9. Handbags.
  2. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  3. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  4. Hat, drill sergeant (not authorized with Army green dress uniform) (para 27-14).
  5. Judge’s apparel (para 27-15).
  6. Military police accessories (not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-16).
  7. Scarf, black (only with black all-weather coat or windbreaker) (para 27-21)
  8. Shirt, white (only with enlisted Army green dress uniform) para 27-22).
  9. Shoes.
    1. Oxford, black (not authorized with the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 27-23).
    2. Pumps, black (para 27-23).
  10. Socks.
    1. Black, cushion sole (worn with boots only) (para 27-24).
    2. Black, dress (authorized only with the slacks) (para 27-24).
  11. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  12. Sweater, unisex cardigan, black (para 27-26).
  13. Sweater, pullover, black (para 27-26).
  14. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  15. Undergarments (para 27-29).
  16. Windbreaker, black (only with class B uniform) (para 27-30).
  17. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army green uniforms (class A and B) and the enlisted Army green dress uniform; note exceptions.
    1. Aiguillette, service (officers only) (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-25).
    2. Brassards (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 28-29).
    3. Branch of service scarves (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform) (para 28-20).
    4. Fourragere/lanyard (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 29-11).
    5. Branch insignia (not authorized on the class B uniform) (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ).
    6. U.S. insignia (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-4).
    7. Insignia of grade (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
    8. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
    9. Distinctive unit insignia (DUI) (not authorized on the enlisted Army green dress uniform and the class B uniform) (para 28-22).
    10. Regimental distinctive insignia (RDI) (para 28-23).
    11. Combat leaders identification (not authorized on the class B uniform or the enlisted Army green dress uniform (para 28-21).
    12. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
    13. Shoulder sleeve insignia, current organization, full color (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-16).
    14. Shoulder sleeve insignia, former wartime service, full color (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-17).
    15. Nameplate (para 28-24).
    16. Organizational flash (para 28-31).
    17. Airborne background trimming (para 28-31).
    18. Overseas service bars (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-28).
    19. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only; not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-27).
    20. Decorations and service medal ribbons (soldiers may not wear miniature medals on the enlisted Army green dress uniform; they may wear full-size or miniature medals on the class B uniform) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
    21. Unit awards (para 29-11).
    22. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill) (cloth special skill and marksmanship badges and tabs are not authorized on the class B uniform; full, miniature, and dress miniature badges are authorized on the class B uniform) (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
    23. Foreign badges (para 29-19).
  18. Insignia authorized for wear with the class B uniform.
    1. Same as paragraph 16-11, except that the DUI, branch and U.S. insignia, sew-on insignia, and combat leaders identification are not authorized for wear.
    2. The DUI is authorized for wear on the black pullover sweater. If no DUI is authorized, then the RDI is worn (para 28-23(2)). Recruiters will wear the recruiting badge in lieu of the DUI or RDI.

16-12. General guidelines

  1. The Army green service uniforms are intended for wear during most duty, non-field, or utility occasions, and for travel and off-duty purposes. While both the class A and B uniforms are authorized for year-round wear, the appropriate uniform is worn based on weather conditions, duties, and the formality of the occasion. When a specific service uniform is not prescribed for formations or other occasions when uniformity in appearance is not required, soldiers may wear the class A or any of the variations of the class B uniform, with the accessories authorized for these uniforms.
  2. Soldiers will not wear those awards and decorations on the AG shade 415 shirt that they cannot wear properly because of size or configuration. Commanders will not require the wear of optional items, such as windbreakers or sweaters, unless such items are provided to the soldier without cost.
  3. Soldiers may purchase and wear the Army green service uniform in any of the authorized fabrics listed in paragraph 16-5. However, individuals who purchase uniforms or uniform items from commercial sources are responsible for ensuring that the items conform to military specifications, or are manufactured in accordance with the procedures prescribed by the uniform quality control program (see chapter 2 for details). Only those alterations authorized by AR 700-84 and TM 10-227 are authorized. General fitting instructions for these uniforms are provided in chapter 1 of this regulation.
  4. When soldiers wear these uniforms with the tuck-in version of the shirt, they will tuck the shirt into the slacks or skirt. When tucked into the slacks, the shirt edge is aligned with the front fly opening, so the outside edge of the belt buckle forms a straight “gig line.” The overblouse version of the shirt is worn outside the slacks or skirt. Only soldiers authorized to wear the tan, green, or maroon berets, those assigned to Air Assault coded positions, and MPs performing MP duties may wear bloused slacks with black leather combat boots.

Chapter 17: Green Maternity Service Uniform

17-1. Authorization for wear

The Army green maternity uniform is authorized for year-round wear by pregnant soldiers as a service or dress uniform, when prescribed for wear by CTA 50-900, AR 700-84, and the commander. (See fig 17-1 for the Army green maternity service uniform, class A; see fig 17-2 for the Army green maternity service uniform, class B.)

Figure 17-1. Army green maternity service uniform, class A

Figure 17-2. Army green maternity service uniform, class B

17-2. Composition

  1. The class A Army green maternity uniform consists of the Army green maternity skirt or slacks, tunic, the AG shade 415 long- or short-sleeved maternity shirt, and black neck tab. For accessories and other items authorized for wear on the class A Army green maternity uniform, see paragraph 17-11.
  2. The class B Army green maternity uniform consists of the Army green maternity skirt or slacks, and the AG shade 415 long- or short-sleeved shirt. Soldiers will wear the neck tab with the long-sleeved shirt when it is worn with or without the tunic. (See para 17-11 for accessories and other items authorized for wear with the class B Army green maternity uniform.)
  3. The Army green maternity dress uniform (authorized for all pregnant soldiers) consists of the Army green maternity skirt, tunic, AG shade 415 long- or short-sleeved shirt, and black neck tab. The black beret is authorized for wear with this uniform. When the Army green maternity dress uniform is worn for evening social occasions (after retreat), headgear is not required. The Army green maternity dress uniform is equivalent to the Army blue and white uniforms. Organizational items, such as brassards and MP accessories, are not authorized for wear with the Army green maternity dress uniform. All other accessories and insignia that are authorized for wear with the class A Army green maternity uniform are authorized for wear with the Army green maternity dress uniform (see para 17-11 below).

17-3. Classification

The Army green maternity service uniform is provided as a supplemental issue uniform to enlisted soldiers, according to CTA 50-900 and AR 700-84. The Army green maternity service uniform is classified as an optional dress uniform for all female personnel during pregnancy. The beret is an organizational issue item. DA Pam 710-2-1 governs turn-in and reissue of the beret.

17-4. Occasions for wear

  1. All pregnant soldiers may wear the Army green maternity service uniform (class A) and authorized variations (class B maternity uniform) when on duty, off duty, or during travel. These uniforms also are acceptable for formal and informal social functions after retreat. Pregnant soldiers may wear appropriate civilian maternity attire in lieu of the uniform for social functions, in accordance with paragraphs 1-7 and 1-8.
  2. The following are appropriate occasions for pregnant soldiers to wear the Army green maternity dress uniform.
    1. At social functions of a private or official nature, either before or after retreat.
    2. When designated by the host.

17-5. Materials

  1. The skirt, slacks, and tunic are all made of 100 percent, texturized polyester, AG shade 491.
  2. For headgear material, see paragraph 16-5 of this regulation.

17-6. Tunic, Army green, maternity

  1. Design. The tunic will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The tunic is hip length with a V-neck design, pockets at the side seams, and pleats that form below the bustline.

17-7. Skirt, Army green, maternity

  1. Design. The skirt will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The skirt is knee length, with an elastic waistband and a nylon-knitted, stretch-front panel.

17-8. Slacks, Army green, maternity

  1. Design. The slacks will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The slacks are straight legged, with an elastic waistband and nylon-knitted, stretch-front panel.
  3. Slack leg ornamentation. Ornamental braid is sewn on each outside seam of the slack leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the slack leg, as follows:
    1. General officers. Each slack leg has two -inch-wide black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braids sewn inch apart.
    2. Other officers. Each leg has one braid, 1-inch wide, made of black mohair, polyester, or mercerized cotton braid.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The slack leg is plain.

17-9. Shirts, long- and short-sleeved, maternity

  1. Pre-cured, durable-press, 65/35 polyester and cotton broadcloth, AG shade 415, in long- and short-sleeved versions. The shirt has an eight-button front, a straight-cut bottom, and turndown-style collars with shoulder loops.
  2. Personnel may wear the short-sleeved shirt with or without the black neck tab. Soldiers will wear the long-sleeved shirt with a black neck tab when it is worn with or without the tunic. Soldiers may not starch or bleach the AG shade 415 shirts.
  3. Soldiers have the option of wearing a neck tab when they wear the short- or long-sleeved shirts with the cardigan sweater. If a neck tab is worn, soldiers will wear the collar of the shirt inside the sweater. If no neck tab is worn, soldiers may wear the collar inside or outside the sweater. Soldiers may wear the cardigan sweater buttoned or unbuttoned while indoors; outdoors, pregnant soldiers may wear the cardigan unbuttoned.

17-10. Headgear

See paragraphs 3-5 and 16-10 and for the description and wear of authorized headgear.

17-11. Items normally worn with the Army green maternity uniform

  1. Accessories. The following accessories are worn with the Army green maternity service and dress uniforms; note exceptions:
    1. Boots, combat, leather, black (only when bloused slacks are authorized; not authorized with the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 27-3).
    2. Cap, service, cold weather, AG shade 489 (only when wearing the black all-weather coat or black windbreaker) (para 27-5).
    3. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    4. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
    5. Gloves, black, leather, unisex, dress (only with Army green maternity service and dress uniforms, black all-weather coat, or windbreaker) (para 27-12).
    6. Handbags.
  2. Black, clutch type, optional purchase (para 27-13).
  3. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  4. Hat, drill sergeant (not authorized with Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 27-14).
  5. Judge’s apparel (para 27-15).
  6. Military Police accessories (not authorized with the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 27-16).
  7. Scarf, black (only with black all-weather coat or windbreaker) (para 27-21).
  8. Shoes.
    1. Oxford, black (not authorized with the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 27-23).
    2. Pumps, black (para 27-23).
  9. Socks.
    1. Black, cushion sole (worn with boots only) (para 27-24).
    2. Black (authorized only with the slacks) (para 27-24).
  10. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  11. Sweater, unisex cardigan, black (para 27-26).
  12. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  13. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  14. The following insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments are worn on the Army green maternity service and dress uniforms; note exceptions.
    1. Aiguillette, service (officers only) (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 28-25).
    2. Brassards (not authorized on the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 28-29).
    3. Branch of service scarves (not authorized on Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 28-20).
    4. Fouragerre/lanyards (not authorized on the class B uniform) (para 29-11).
    5. Insignia of grade (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
    6. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
    7. Distinctive unit insignia (DUI) (not authorized on the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 28-22).
    8. Regimental distinctive insignia (RDI) (para 28-23).
    9. Nameplate (para 28-24).
    10. Organizational flash (worn on berets; not authorized on the Army green maternity dress uniform) (para 28-31).
    11. Airborne background trimming (para 28-31).
    12. Decoration and service medal ribbons, (only full-size medals may be worn on the Army green maternity dress uniform) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
    13. Unit awards (para 29-11).
    14. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill badges) (cloth special skill and marksmanship badges and tabs are not authorized on the class B Army green maternity uniform; full, miniature, and dress miniature badges are authorized on the class B Army green maternity uniform (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
    15. Foreign badges (para 29-19).
  15. Insignia authorized for wear with the class B Army green maternity uniform. Same as paragraph 17-11, except that the DUI, branch and U.S. insignias, sew-on insignia, and combat leaders identification are not authorized for wear.

17-12. General guidelines

  1. The Army green maternity service uniform is intended for wear during most duty, non-field occasions, and for travel and off-duty purposes. While both the class A and B Army green maternity uniforms are authorized for year-round wear, the appropriate uniform is worn based on weather conditions, duties, and the formality of the occasion. When a specific service uniform is not prescribed for formations or other occasions when uniformity in appearance is required, soldiers may wear the class A or any of the variations of the class B uniform, with the accessories authorized for these uniforms. Those awards and decorations that cannot be worn properly because of size or configuration will not be worn on the AG shade 415 shirt. Commanders will not require the wear of optional items, such as cardigan sweaters, unless such items are provided to the soldier without cost.
  2. This uniform is worn with the maternity shirt left outside the skirt and slacks, with or without the maternity tunic. Pregnant soldiers may wear the black all-weather coat unbuttoned, if necessary. Only soldiers authorized to wear the tan, green, or maroon berets, those assigned to Air Assault coded positions, and MPs performing MP duties may wear bloused slacks with black leather combat boots. Figures 17-1 and 17-2 show the class A and B Army green maternity uniform.

Part Four Dress Uniforms

Chapter 18: Army White Uniform Male

18-1. Authorization for wear

The Army white uniform is authorized for wear by all male personnel as an optional dress uniform. Personnel normally wear this uniform from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II, where they may wear it year-round (see CTA 50-900). (For Army white uniform, officer, see fig 18-1; for service cap, white, general and field grade officers, see fig 18-2; for service cap, white, company grade officers, see fig 18-3; for service cap, white, warrant officers, see fig 18-4; for Army white uniform, enlisted, see fig 18-5; and for service cap, white, enlisted, see fig 18-6.)

Figure 18-1. Army white uniform, officer

Figure 18-2. Service cap, white, general and field grade officers

Figure 18-3. Service cap, white, company grade officers

Figure 18-4. Service cap, white, warrant officers

Figure 18-5. Army white uniform, enlisted

Figure 18-6. Service cap, white, enlisted

18-2. Composition

The Army white uniform comprises the Army white coat and trousers, white shirt, and black bow tie or black four-in-hand necktie.

18-3. Occasions for wear

  1. The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army white uniform.
    1. On duty in all areas, when appropriate and authorized by the local commander.
    2. Off duty, for social occasions.
  2. Personnel may wear the Army white uniform with either the black bow tie or the black four-in-hand tie. When worn with a black bow tie, the Army white uniform constitutes a dress uniform and corresponds to a civilian summer tuxedo. When worn with a black four-in-hand tie, the Army white uniform is an informal uniform.

18-4. Materials

The material for this uniform is white polyester and texturized woven serge, 6.5-ounce weight.

18-5. Coat, Army white

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The coat is a single-breasted, peak-lapel, four-button coat extending below the crotch, fitting easily over the chest and shoulders, with a slight draped effect in the front and back. The coat is fitted slightly at the waist, conforming to body shape without tightness and with no prominent flare.
  3. Coat sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers. The sleeve has a band of white mohair or white mercerized cotton braid 1 inches wide sewn on each sleeve, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    2. Other officers. The sleeve has a band of white mohair or white mercerized cotton braid inch wide sewn on each sleeve, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The sleeve is plain.

18-6. Trousers, Army white

  1. Design. The trousers will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The trousers are straight legged without cuffs, and with front and hip pockets that are cut in a civilian style. Trousers that are made from 100 percent polyester should be lined. There is no ornamentation on the Army white trousers.

18-7. Shirt, white

A commercial, long-sleeved white shirt with barrel or French cuffs, and standard turndown collar is worn with the Army white uniform. (See para 27-22 for a complete description.)

18-8. Service cap, Army white

  1. Design. The cap will be made from an approved specification or pattern, in a standard Army design. Officers have the option of wearing the cap frame with a removable cover made of the same material as the rest of the uniform.
  2. Visor and visor ornamentation. The visor is plain black leather, or poromeric with a leather finish. The visor ornamentation is as follows.
    1. General and field grade officers. The top of the visor is black cloth with two arcs of oak leaves in groups of two, embroidered in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold-colored yarn, or manufactured from anodized aluminum in 24-karat gold color.
    2. Company grade officers, warrant officers, and enlisted personnel. The top of the visor is plain black shell cordovan or shell cordovan-finish leather, resin treated, with a waterproof edge.
  3. Chinstrap and chinstrap ornamentation. The chinstrap consists of two straps, each inch in width by 10 inches in length, with one end of each strap forming a slide, and the other end of each strap fastened to the cap at each end of the visor. The chinstrap ornamentation is as follows.
    1. Officers. The chinstrap is natural or light brown, full-grain pigskin or sheepskin, non-bleeding, with pointed ends covered with two-vellum gold wire lace, synthetic metallic gold-colored lace, or a one-piece strap manufactured from anodized aluminum in 24-karat gold color.
    2. Enlisted personnel. The chinstrap is plain black leather matching the visor in appearance, with rounded ends. Poromeric with a leather finish is authorized.
  4. Hatband. All personnel will wear a white mercerized cotton braid or white mohair braid hatband, 1 inches in width, around the entire outside rim of the cap, with the bottom edge of the hatband covered with black cloth.
  5. Cap insignia. Insignia is worn on the Army white service cap secured through the front eyelet. The service cap insignia is described in paragraph 28-3.
  6. Wear.
    1. All male personnel will wear the Army white service cap with the Army white uniform and the white mess and the white evening mess uniforms.
    2. Personnel are not required to wear headgear when wearing the Army white uniform to evening social functions (after retreat). However, on all other occasions, personnel will wear headgear with this uniform.
  7. Proper wear position. The service cap is worn straight on the head so that the white hatband on the cap creates a straight line around the head, parallel to the ground. Such positioning automatically positions the visor correctly, so that it does not interfere with vision or ride up on the forehead. Personnel will not alter the shape of the service cap in any manner.

18-9. Cape, Army blue

As an option, all officers are authorized to wear the Army blue cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army white uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See para 27-6 for design and wear policy.)

18-10. Items normally worn with the Army white uniform

  1. Accessories.
    1. Belt and buckle/suspenders (paras 27-2 and , and 27-25).
    2. Buttons (para 27-4).
    3. Cape (officers only) (para 27-6).
    4. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    5. Coat, black, all-weather (para 27-8).
    6. Cuff links and studs, gold (para 27-10).
    7. Gloves.
  2. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
  3. White, dress (para 27-12).
  4. Neckties.
    1. Black, bow (worn after retreat) (para 27-19).
    2. Black, four-in-hand (worn on duty) (para 27-19).
  5. Scarf, black (only with black all-weather coat) (para 27-21).
  6. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  7. Socks, black (para 27-24).
  8. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  9. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army white uniform.
    1. Aiguillettes (officers only).
  10. Service (para 28-25).
  11. Dress (para 28-26).
  12. Fourragere/lanyards (para 29-11(3)).
  13. Distinctive items authorized for Infantry personnel (para 28-30).
  14. Branch insignia (para 28-10 and 28-12).
  15. U.S. insignia (para 28-4).
  16. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  17. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  18. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  19. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
  20. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  21. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  22. Decoration and service medal ribbons (full-size or miniature medals may be worn after retreat) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
  23. Unit awards (para 29-11).
  24. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat and special skill, full-size and miniature); dress miniature combat and special skill badges will be worn when miniature medals are worn (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
  25. Foreign badges (para 29-19).

18-11. General guidelines

General fitting instructions for this uniform are provided in chapter 1 of this regulation. When the Army white uniform is worn to social functions, soldiers may wear gold or gold-colored cuff links and studs. The black all-weather coat is authorized for wear. Personnel may wear white gloves with the basic uniform. Black oxford shoes with black socks are the only authorized footwear.

Chapter 19: Army White Uniform Female

19-1. Authorization for wear

Figure 19-1. Army white uniform, female

  1. The Army white uniform is authorized for wear by all female personnel as an optional dress uniform. Personnel normally wear this uniform from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II where they may wear it year-round (see CTA 50-900). (See fig 19-1 for the Army white uniform, female.)
  2. There are two versions of the Army white coat that officer and enlisted females may wear. The older version was designed prior to 10 August 1992 and is described in paragraph 19-5(1), below. The military specification for the Army white coat was changed on 10 August 1992 to the same pattern as the Army green coat. The new version is described in paragraph 19-5(2), below. Soldiers may continue to wear the older version of the coat (with rounded collars) as long as the uniform is in serviceable condition.

19-2. Composition

The Army white uniform comprises the Army white coat, skirt, and a white short-sleeved shirt with black neck tab.

19-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army white uniform.

  1. On duty in all areas, when appropriate and authorized by the local commander.
  2. Off duty, for social occasions.

19-4. Materials

The material for this uniform is white polyester and texturized woven serge, 6.5-ounce weight.

19-5. Coat, Army white

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description.
    1. Old version. The coat is a single-breasted, four-button, hip-length coat with two slanted front pockets, button-down shoulder loops, and an easy-fitting open collar and lapels.
    2. New version. The coat is a single-breasted, four-button, hip-length coat, with two slanted flap front pockets, button-down shoulder loops, a notched collar, and side-body construction.
  3. Coat sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers. The sleeve has a band of white mohair or white mercerized cotton braid 1 inches wide sewn on each sleeve, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    2. Other officers. The sleeve has a band of white mohair or white mercerized cotton braid inch wide sewn on each sleeve, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The sleeve is plain.

19-6. Skirt, Army white

  1. Design. The skirt will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The skirt is knee length, with a three-piece front and three-piece back, slightly flared, with a waistband and a zipper closure on the left side.

19-7. Shirt, white

A short-sleeved white shirt with black neck tab is worn with the Army white uniform. (See para 27-22 for a complete description.)

19-8. Capes, Army blue and black

As an option, all female officers are authorized to wear the Army blue or the Army black cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army white uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See paragraph 27-6 for a complete description.)

19-9. Service hat, Army white

  1. Design. The hat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The hat has an oval-shaped crown and a detachable hatband for placement of insignia. Hat insignia is worn centered and secured through the hatband. (See para 28-3 for a description of insignia wear.)
  3. Hatband. The detachable hatband has three rows of stitching of matching thread at the top of the band, and ornamentation as follows.
    1. General and field grade officers. The hat has two arcs of laurel leaves grouped in twos, embroidered in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold-colored braid, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.
    2. Company grade officers and warrant officers. The hat has a band of -inch, two-vellum gold, gold-colored synthetic metallic braid, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid, placed on the bottom edge of the hatband.
    3. Enlisted personnel. There is no ornamentation on the hatband.
  4. Wear. All female personnel may wear the Army white service hat with the Army white uniform. Personnel are not required to wear headgear when wearing the Army white uniform to evening social functions (after retreat). However, on all other occasions, personnel will wear headgear with this uniform.
  5. Proper wear position. The service hat is worn straight on the head so that the hatband creates a straight line around the head, parallel to the ground. Hair will not be visible below the front brim of the hat, and there should be to 1 inch distance between the eyebrow and the brim of the hat.

19-10. Items normally worn with the Army white uniform

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Capes (officers only).
  2. Black (para 27-6).
  3. Blue (para 27-6).
  4. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
  5. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
  6. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  7. Handbag, white dress (para 27-13).
  8. Scarf, black (only with black all-weather coat or windbreaker) (para 27-21).
  9. Shirt, white, short-sleeved (para 27-22).
  10. Shoes, white, pump (paras 27-23 and ).
  11. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  12. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  13. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  14. Insignia, awards, badges and accouterments worn on the Army white uniform.
    1. Aiguillettes (officers only).
  15. Service (para 28-25).
  16. Dress (para 28-26).
  17. Fourragere/lanyards (para 28-11(3)).
  18. Branch insignia (para 28-10 and 28-12).
  19. U.S. insignia (para 28-4).
  20. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  21. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  22. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  23. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
  24. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  25. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  26. Decoration and service medal ribbons (full size or miniature medals may be worn after retreat) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9)).
  27. Unit awards (para 29-11).
  28. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat and special skill, full size and miniature); dress miniature combat and special skill badges will be worn when miniature medals are worn (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
  29. Foreign badges (para 29-19).

19-11. General guidelines

  1. The skirt is worn no longer than 1 inch above, or 2 inches below the crease in the back of the knee. The black all-weather coat is authorized for wear with this uniform. Personnel may wear white gloves with the basic uniform. Females may carry the white leather handbag during duty or after duty hours; they may carry the white fabric handbag only after duty hours, however. White pumps and sheer stockings are the authorized footwear for this uniform. After duty hours, personnel may wear white fabric pumps with this uniform.
  2. Soldiers who possess the old version of the Army white coat will wear one branch and one U.S. insignia on the collar. Those who possess the new version of the Army white coat will wear their insignia as they do on the Army green coat (see paras 28-4 and 28-12 and ).

Chapter 20: Army Blue Uniform Male

20-1. Authorization for wear

  1. The Army blue uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all male personnel.
  2. All active duty officers are required to own the Army blue uniform for wear on appropriate occasions. The only exception to this policy applies to officers who are on active duty for 6 months or less, who have the option of purchasing the Army blue uniform.
  3. The Army blue uniform is authorized for optional wear for enlisted personnel.
  4. When prescribed by CTA 50-900, the Army blue uniform is worn as an organizational uniform.

20-2. Composition

The Army blue uniform comprises a dark-blue coat, dark-blue or light-blue trousers, a white turndown-collar shirt, and a black bow tie or black four-in-hand necktie. When worn with a black bow tie, the Army blue uniform constitutes a formal uniform and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. When worn with a black four-in-hand necktie, the Army blue uniform is an informal uniform. (For the Army blue uniform, officer, see fig 20-1; for the service cap, blue, general officers, see fig 20-2; for the service cap, blue, field grade officers, see fig 20-3; for the service cap, blue, company grade officers, see fig 20-4; for the service cap, blue, warrant officers, see fig 20-5; for the Army blue uniform, enlisted, see fig 20-6; for the service cap, blue, enlisted, see fig 20-7.)

Figure 20-1. Army blue uniform, officer

Figure 20-2. Service cap, blue, general officers

Figure 20-3. Service cap, blue, field grade officers

Figure 20-4. Service cap, blue, company grade officers

Figure 20-5. Service cap, blue, warrant officers

Figure 20-6. Army blue uniform, enlisted

Figure 20-7. Service cap, blue, enlisted

20-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army blue uniform.

  1. On duty, as prescribed by the local commander.
  2. For social functions of a general or official nature, before or after retreat.
  3. On other appropriate occasions, as desired by the individual.

20-4. Materials

  1. Coat
    1. Wool barathea, 14-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 150.
    2. Wool gabardine, 11- or 14.5-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 150.
    3. Wool elastique, 16-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 150.
    4. Wool tropical, 10.5-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 150.
    5. Polyester and wool-blend fabric in twill weave, 9.5-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 450.
    6. Polyester and wool-blend fabric in plain weave, 9.5-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 450.
  2. Trousers.
    1. General officers. The coat and trousers will be made in the same material and shade.
    2. Other officers and enlisted personnel. The trousers are made in the same material as the coat, except the color will be light blue, in Army shade 151 or 451.
  3. Headgear, service cap. The service cap will be made in the same material and shade as the coat, except that officers also are authorized to wear the service cap in fur felt, 9-ounce weight, dark blue, Army shade 250.
  4. Braid. Nylon gold-colored braid or synthetic metallic gold braid is more suitable than gold bullion when attached to lightweight fabrics (11 ounces or less).

20-5. Coat, Army blue

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The Army blue coat is a single-breasted, peak-lapel, four-button coat extending below the crotch, fitting easily over the chest and shoulders, with a slight draped effect in front and back. The coat is fitted slightly at the waist, conforming to the body shape without tightness and with no prominent flare.
  3. Shoulder buttons.
    1. Officers authorized to wear an aiguillette will attach a 20-ligne button on the left or right outside shoulder seam of the Army blue coat, depending upon the position in which the aiguillette is worn.
    2. Officers authorized to wear a fourragere will attach a 20-ligne button on the left shoulder seam, inch outside the collar edge.
  4. Shoulder ornamentation and insignia.
    1. Shoulder straps for officers. (See para 28-8 for ornamentation and insignia.)
    2. Shoulder loops for enlisted personnel.
  5. A shoulder loop of the same material as the coat is used and attached on each shoulder.
  6. The loop is 2 inches wide at the outside shoulder edge, 1 inches wide at the inside collar edge, and piped all around with gold-colored nylon or rayon cord edge braid, ?; inch wide. The braid is inserted in the joining seams so it is completely visible around each loop. The loop is sewn on the outside shoulder seam and extends to a point approximately inch from the inside collar seam. The loop has a buttonhole ? inch from the inside edge of the braid, which is buttoned to the shoulder with a 25-ligne button.
  7. Coat sleeve ornamentation. Ornamental braid is worn on both sleeves of the Army blue coat. Gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid is authorized for officers. Gold-colored nylon or rayon braid is authorized for enlisted personnel. The braid on the trouser legs and the coat sleeve will be of the same material. The bottom of the braid is positioned parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve as follows.
    1. General officers have one 1 inch gold braid on each sleeve.
    2. For all other officers, each sleeve has a -inch braid consisting of two, -inch gold braids placed inch apart on silk material, of the first-named color of their basic branch.
    3. Enlisted personnel have a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon on each sleeve.

20-6. Trousers, Army blue

  1. Design. The trousers will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description.
    1. Low-waisted. The low-waisted blue trousers are straight-legged without cuffs, with side and hip pockets. The left hip pocket has a buttonhole tab and button.
    2. High-waisted. The high-waisted blue trousers are authorized for wear with the Army blue uniform instead of low-waisted trousers. The high-waisted trousers are required for wear with the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms. High-waisted trousers are cut along the lines of civilian dress trousers, with a high waist, and without pleats, cuffs, or hip pockets.
    3. Trouser leg ornamentation. Ornamental braid is worn on each outside seam of the trouser leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the trouser leg, as follows:
  3. General officers have two, -inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braids, spaced inch apart.
  4. All other officers have one, 1 inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.
  5. Enlisted personnel have one 1 inch gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.

20-7. Shirt, white

A commercial long-sleeved white shirt with barrel or French cuffs and a standard turndown collar is worn with the Army blue uniform. (See para 27-22 for a complete description.)

20-8. Service cap, Army blue

  1. Design. The cap will be made from an approved specification or pattern, in a standard Army design. Officers have the option of wearing the cap frame with a removable cover made of the same material as the rest of the uniform.
  2. Visor and visor ornamentation. The visor is plain black leather, or poromeric with a leather finish. The visor ornamentation is as follows:
    1. General and field grade officers. The top of the visor is black cloth with two arcs of oak leaves in groups of two, embroidered in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold-colored yarn, or manufactured from anodized aluminum in 24-karat gold color.
    2. Company grade officers, warrant officers, and enlisted personnel. The top of the visor is plain black shell cordovan or shell cordovan-finish leather, resin treated, with a waterproof edge.
  3. Chinstrap and chinstrap ornamentation. The chinstrap consists of two straps, each inch in width by 10 inches in length, with one end of each strap forming a slide, and the other end of each strap fastened to the cap at each end of the visor. The chinstrap ornamentation is as follows.
    1. Officers. The chinstrap is natural or light brown, full-grain pigskin or sheepskin, non-bleeding, with pointed ends covered with two-vellum gold wire lace, synthetic metallic gold-colored lace, or a one-piece strap manufactured from anodized aluminum in 24-karat gold color.
    2. Enlisted personnel. The chinstrap is plain black leather matching the visor in appearance, with rounded ends. Poromeric with a leather finish is authorized.
  4. Hatband. All personnel will wear an outside hatband, 1 inches in width, around the entire outside rim of the cap. The hatband ornamentation follows.
    1. General officers. The band is blue-black velvet with two arcs of oak leaves in groups of two, 1 inch long and inch wide, embroidered in gold, synthetic metallic gold-colored braid, or gold-colored nylon or rayon.
    2. All other officers. The band is grosgrain silk of the first-named color of the officer’s basic branch, with a band of inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid, placed at the top and bottom of the hatband. If the officer’s branch has two colors, ?;-inch piping of the second color is placed on the inside edges of the gold braid.
    3. Enlisted personnel. The band is basket-weave mohair braid matching the shade of the cap material, with a -inch band of two- vellum gold-colored nylon, rayon, or polyester braid placed at the top part of the hatband.
  5. Cap insignia. Insignia is worn on the Army blue service cap secured through the front eyelet. The service cap insignia is described in paragraph 28-3.
  6. Wear.
    1. All male personnel will wear the Army blue service cap with the Army blue, blue mess, and blue evening mess uniforms.
    2. Personnel are not required to wear headgear when wearing the Army blue uniform to evening social functions (after retreat). However, on all other occasions, personnel will wear headgear with this uniform.
  7. Proper wear position. The service cap is worn straight on the head so that the braid hatband on the service cap creates a straight line around the head, parallel to the ground. Such positioning automatically positions the visor correctly, so that it does not interfere with vision or ride up on the forehead. Personnel will not alter the shape of the service cap in any manner.

20-9. Cape, Army blue

As an option, all officers are authorized to wear the Army blue cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army blue uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See para 27-6 for design and wear policy.)

20-10. Items normally worn with the Army blue uniform

  1. Accessories.
    1. Belt with buckle/suspenders (paras 27-2 and , and 27-25).
    2. Buttons (para 27-4).
    3. Cape (officers only) (para 27-6).
    4. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
    5. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
    6. Cuff links and studs, gold (para 27-10).
    7. Gloves.
  2. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
  3. White, dress (para 27-12).
  4. Headgear, cap, service, cold weather, AG 489 (para 27-5).
  5. Neckties.
    1. Black, bow (worn after retreat) (para 27-19).
    2. Black, four-in-hand (worn on duty) (para 27-19).
  6. Scarf, black (para 27-21).
  7. Shirt, white, long sleeve (para 27-22).
  8. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  9. Socks, black (para 27-24).
  10. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  11. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army blue uniform.
    1. Aiguillettes (officers only).
  12. Service (para 28-25).
  13. Dress (para 28-26).
  14. Fourragere/lanyards (para 28-11).
  15. Distinctive items authorized for Infantry personnel (para 28-30).
  16. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ).
  17. U.S. insignia (para 28-4).
  18. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  19. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  20. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  21. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
  22. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  23. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  24. Decoration and service medal ribbons (full size or miniature medals may be worn after retreat) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
  25. Unit awards (para 29-11).
  26. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat and special skill, full size and miniature); dress miniature combat and special skill badges will be worn when miniature medals are worn (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
  27. Foreign badges (para 29-19).

20-11. General guidelines

  1. General fitting instructions for this uniform are provided in chapter 1 of this regulation. Suspenders are authorized for wear with this uniform. Personnel may wear optional purchase gold or gold-colored cuff links and studs with this uniform at social functions. The black scarf and black leather dress gloves are authorized for wear with the black all-weather coat. Soldiers may wear white gloves with the basic uniform. When weather conditions warrant, the AG 489 cold-weather cap is authorized for wear with the black all-weather coat or the cape. Black oxford shoes with black socks are the only authorized footwear for this uniform. (See para 28-10 for information on color ornamentation and branch insignia for detailed officers.)
  2. Enlisted personnel assigned to units authorized by CTA 50-900 to wear the Army blue uniform as an organizational uniform, such as table of organization and equipment (TOE) bands, selected honor guards, and other ceremonial units, may wear distinctive unit insignia (DUI), military police accessories, and other items authorized by CTA 50-900, when prescribed by the commander.

Chapter 21: Army Blue Uniform Female

21-1. Authorization for wear

Figure 21-1. Army blue uniform, female

  1. The Army blue uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all female personnel. (Fig 21-1 shows the Army blue uniform with the old and new version coats, and authorized headgear.)
  2. All active duty officers are required to own the Army blue uniform for wear on appropriate occasions. The only exception to this policy applies to officers who are on active duty for 6 months or less, who have the option of purchasing the Army blue uniform.
  3. The Army blue uniform is authorized for optional wear for enlisted personnel.
  4. When prescribed by CTA 50-900, the Army blue uniform is worn as an organizational uniform.
  5. There are two versions of the Army blue coat that officer and enlisted personnel may wear. The older version was designed prior to 10 August 1992 and is described in paragraph 21-5(1), below. The military specification for the Army blue coat was changed on 10 August 1992 to the same pattern as the Army green coat. The new version is described in paragraph 21-5(2), below. Soldiers may continue to wear the older version of the coat (with the rounded collars) as long as the uniform is in serviceable condition.

21-2. Composition

The Army blue uniform comprises an Army blue coat, slacks, skirt, and a white short-sleeved shirt with a black neck tab.

21-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army blue uniform.

  1. On duty, as prescribed by the local commander.
  2. For social functions of a general or official nature, before or after retreat.
  3. On other appropriate occasions, as desired by the individual.

21-4. Materials

  1. Coat, skirt, slacks, and service hat.
    1. Wool barathea, 12- or 14-ounce weight, Army blue shade 150.
    2. Wool gabardine, 11- or 14.5-ounce weight, Army blue shade 150.
    3. Wool elastique, 16-ounce weight, Army blue shade 150.
    4. Wool tropical, 10.5-ounce weight, Army blue shade 150.
    5. Polyester and wool blend fabric in gabardine, 9.5-ounce weight, Army blue shade 450.
    6. Polyester and wool blend fabric in tropical 9.5-ounce weight, Army blue shade 450.
  2. Braid. Nylon gold-colored braid or synthetic metallic gold braid is more suitable than gold bullion when attached to lightweight fabrics (11 ounces or less).

21-5. Coat, Army blue

  1. Design. The coat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description.
    1. Old version. The Army blue coat is a single-breasted, four-button, hip-length coat with two slanted front pockets, long sleeves, and an easy-fitting, open collar.
    2. New version. The coat is a single-breasted, four-button, hip-length coat, with two slanted flap front pockets, button-down shoulder loops, notched collar, and side-body construction.
  3. Shoulder buttons.
    1. Officers authorized to wear an aiguillette will attach a 21-ligne button on the left or right outside shoulder seam of the Army blue coat, depending upon the position in which the aiguillette is worn.
    2. Officers authorized to wear a fourragere will attach a 21-ligne button on the left shoulder seam, inch outside the collar edge.
  4. Shoulder ornamentation and insignia.
    1. Shoulder straps for officers. (See para 28-8 for ornamentation and insignia.
    2. Shoulder loops for enlisted personnel.
  5. A shoulder loop of the same material as is used for the coat is attached to each shoulder.
  6. The loop is 2 inches wide at the outside shoulder edge, 1 inches wide at the inside collar edge, and piped all around with gold-colored nylon or rayon cord edge braid, ?; inch wide. The braid is inserted in the joining seams so it is completely visible around each loop. The loop is sewn on the outside shoulder seam and extends to a point approximately inch from the inside collar seam. The loop has a buttonhole ? inch from the inside edge of the braid, which is buttoned to the shoulder with a 25-ligne button.
  7. Coat sleeve ornamentation. Ornamental braid is worn on both sleeves of the Army blue coat. Gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid is authorized for officers. Gold-colored nylon or rayon braid is authorized for enlisted personnel. The braid on the slacks and the coat sleeve will be of the same material. The bottom of the braid is positioned parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve as follows.
    1. General officers have one 1 inch gold braid on each sleeve.
    2. For all other officers, each sleeve has a -inch braid consisting of two -inch gold braids placed inch apart on silk material, of the first-named color of their basic branch.
    3. Enlisted personnel have a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon on each sleeve.

21-6. Skirt, Army blue

  1. Design. The skirt will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The skirt is knee length, with a three-piece front and three-piece back, slightly flared, with a waistband and a zipper closure on the left side.

21-7. Slacks, Army blue

  1. Design. The slacks will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The slacks are straight-legged with slightly flared bottoms and a zipper front closure on the center front. The slacks have two side pockets.
  3. Slack leg ornamentation. Ornamental braid is worn on each outside seam of the slack leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of slack leg, as follows:
    1. General officers have two – inch two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braids, spaced inch apart.
    2. All other officers have one 1- inch two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.
    3. Enlisted personnel have one 1- inch gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.
  4. Personnel will not wear the Army blue slacks for social functions. They are approved for wear by selected females (such as, but not limited to, band, honor guard, and female chaplains), in the performance of their daily duties where the Army blue uniform slacks are more appropriate than the Army blue skirt.

21-8. Shirt, white

A short-sleeved white shirt with black neck tab is worn with the Army blue uniform. (See para 27-22 for a complete description.)

21-9. Capes, Army blue and black

As an option, all female officers are authorized to wear the Army blue or Army black cape instead of the black all-weather coat when wearing the Army blue uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See para 27-6 of this regulation for a complete description of cape wear.)

21-10. Service hat, Army blue

  1. Design. The hat will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The hat has an oval-shaped crown and a detachable hatband for placement of insignia. Hat insignia is worn centered and secured through the hatband. (See para 28-3 for a description of insignia wear.)
  3. Hatband. The detachable hatband has three rows of stitching of matching thread at the top of the band and ornamentation, as follows:
    1. General and field grade officers. The hat has two arcs of laurel leaves grouped in twos, embroidered in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold-colored braid, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.
    2. Company grade officers and warrant officers. The hat has a band of -inch, two-vellum gold, gold-colored synthetic metallic braid, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid, placed on the bottom edge of the hatband.
    3. Enlisted personnel. There is no ornamentation on the hatband.
  4. Wear. All female personnel may wear the Army blue service hat with the Army blue uniform. Personnel are not required to wear headgear when wearing the Army blue uniform to evening social functions (after retreat). However, on all other occasions personnel will wear headgear with this uniform.
  5. Proper wear position. The service hat is worn straight on the head so that the hatband creates a straight line around the head, parallel to the ground. Hair will not be visible below the front brim of the hat, and there should be – to 1-inch distance between the eyebrow and the brim of the hat.

21-11. Items normally worn with the Army blue uniform

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Capes (officers only).
  2. Black (para 27-6).
  3. Blue (para 27-6).
  4. Chaplain’s apparel (para 27-7).
  5. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
  6. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  7. Handbags, black.
    1. Fabric or leather (para 27-13).
    2. Black, shoulder (para 27-13).
  8. Headgear, cap, cold weather, AG 489 (para 27-5).
  9. Scarf, black (para 27-21).
  10. Shirt, white, short-sleeved (para 27-22).
  11. Shoes, black, pump (paras 27-23 and ).
  12. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  13. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  14. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  15. Insignia, awards, badges and accouterments worn on the Army blue uniform.
    1. Aiguillettes (officers only).
  16. Service (para 28-25).
  17. Dress (para 28-26).
  18. Fourragere/lanyards (para 28-11).
  19. Branch insignia (para 28-10 and 28-12).
  20. U.S. insignia (para 28-4).
  21. Grade insignia (paras 28-5, 28-6, 28-7).
  22. Headgear insignia (para 28-3).
  23. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  24. OCS/WOC insignia (paras 28-14 and 28-15 and ).
  25. Nameplate (para 28-24).
  26. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  27. Decoration and service medal ribbons (full-size or miniature medals may be worn after retreat) (paras 29-7, 29-8, and 29-9).
  28. Unit awards (para 29-11).
  29. U.S. badges (identification, marksmanship, combat and special skill, full size and miniature); dress miniature combat and special skill badges will be worn when miniature medals are worn (paras 29-13, 29-16, 29-17, and 29-18).
  30. Foreign badges (para 29-19).

21-12. General guidelines

  1. The skirt is worn no longer than 1 inch above, or 2 inches below the crease in the back of the knee. The black scarf and the black leather dress gloves are authorized for wear with the black all-weather coat. Personnel may wear white gloves with the basic uniform. Females may carry the black leather handbag during duty or after duty hours; they may carry the black fabric handbag only after duty hours, however. When weather conditions warrant, the AG 489 cold-weather cap is authorized for wear with the black all-weather coat or the capes. Black pumps and sheer stockings are the authorized footwear for this uniform. After duty hours, personnel may wear the black fabric pumps with this uniform. (See para 28-10 for information on color ornamentation and branch insignia for detailed officers.)
  2. Enlisted personnel assigned to units authorized by CTA 50-900 to wear the Army blue uniform as an organizational uniform, such as table of organization and equipment (TOE) bands, selected honor guards, and other ceremonial units, may wear distinctive unit insignia (DUI), Military Police accessories, and other items authorized by CTA 50-900, when prescribed by the commander.
  3. Soldiers who possess the old version of the Army blue coat will wear one branch and one U.S. insignia on the collar. Those who possess the new version of the Army blue coat will wear their insignia as they do on the Army green coat (see paras 28-4 and 28-12 and of this regulation).

Chapter 22: Army White Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Male

22-1. Authorization for wear

The Army white mess and Army white evening mess uniforms are authorized for optional wear by all male personnel. Personnel normally wear these uniforms from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II, where they may wear them year-round (see CTA 50-900). (See fig 22-1 for Army white mess uniform, general officers; see fig 22-2 for Army white mess uniform, other officers; see fig 22-3 for Army white mess uniform, enlisted.)

Figure 22-1. Army white mess uniform, general officers

Figure 22-2. Army white mess uniform, other officers

Figure 22-3. Army white mess uniform, enlisted

22-2. Composition

  1. The Army white mess uniform comprises the Army white jacket, black high-waisted trousers, white semiformal dress shirt with a turndown collar, black bow tie, and black cummerbund (see figs 22-1 and 22-3 and ).
  2. The Army white evening mess uniform comprises the Army white jacket, black high-waisted trousers, white formal dress shirt with a wing collar, white vest, and white bow tie (see fig 22-2).

22-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army white mess and white evening mess uniforms.

  1. Social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat.
  2. Private, formal dinners or other private, formal social functions held after retreat.

22-4. Materials

  1. White jacket and vest.
    1. Cotton twill, 8.2-ounce weight, white.
    2. Polyester and wool blend fabric in plain weave, 9-ounce tropical weight, white.
    3. Polyester and wool blend fabric in gabardine, 10.5-ounce weight, white.
    4. Polyester texturized woven serge, 6.5-ounce weight, white.
  2. Trousers. Commercial, black, of a tuxedo-type lightweight material.

22-5. Jacket, Army white

  1. Design. The jacket will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The jacket, which is cut on the lines of an evening dress coat, descends to the point of the hips and is slightly curved to a peak in back and in front. Two 25-ligne buttons, joined by a small gold or gold-colored chain about 1 inches long, are worn in the upper buttonholes. The shoulders have a device for the attachment of shoulder knots on officer uniforms.

Figure 22-11. Shoulder knot

  1. Shoulder knots. (See para 24-5 and fig 22-11.)
  2. Jacket sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers wear a cuff of white mohair or mercerized cotton braid 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued, metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered white cloth or silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter and are worn with one point facing upward. The following describes general officer stars:

Figure 22-4. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, general

  1. General insignia is four stars, with 1 inches between the midpoints, centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 22-4).

Figure 22-5. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, lieutenant general

  1. Lieutenant general insignia is three stars, with 1? inches between the midpoints, with the middle star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 22-5).

Figure 22-6. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, major general

  1. Major general insignia is two stars, with 2 inches between the midpoints, centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 22-6).

Figure 22-7. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, brigadier general

  1. Brigadier general insignia is one star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 22-7).

Figure 22-8. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, field and company grade officers

Figure 22-9. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, warrant officers

  1. Other commissioned and warrant officers wear a band of white mohair or mercerized cotton braid sewn on each sleeve, inch wide, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve. A trefoil is attached to the upper edge of the braid on each sleeve. It consists of a knot composed of three loops, one large upper loop and two small lower loops of -inch white soutache braid, interlaced at the points of crossing, with the ends of the knots resting on the sleeve braid. Officer grade insignia (non- subdued pin-on or embroidered white cloth) is worn vertically in the center of the space formed by the lower curves of the knot and the upper edge of the braid (see figs 22-8 and 22-9).
  2. Previously authorized sleeve ornamentation, which consists of the sleeve band, the branch insignia centered in the space formed by the lower curves of the trefoil and the upper edge of the sleeve band, and the number of trefoils appropriate to the specific grade of the wearer, is authorized for wear for the life of the jacket. This option is for commissioned officers only, and it applies only to jackets purchased prior to 11 August 1975. This ornamentation is not authorized for jackets purchased after 11 August 1975.

Figure 22-10. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, enlisted

  1. Enlisted personnel wear a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon, 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve (see fig 22-10).

22-6. Trousers, black

  1. Design. The trousers will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The black trousers are cut along the lines of civilian dress trousers, with a high waist and without pleats, cuffs, or hip pockets.
  3. Trouser leg ornamentation. The trouser leg ornamentation consists of a black silk or satin braid, no less than inch wide, or more than 1 inch wide, sewn on the outside seam of the trouser leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the trouser leg.

22-7. Shirts, white dress

  1. Semiformal. A commercial, white, long-sleeved semiformal dress shirt with a soft bosom, French cuffs, and a standard turndown collar is worn with the Army white mess uniform when it is worn with the black cummerbund and black bow tie.
  2. Formal. A commercial, white, long-sleeved formal dress shirt with a stiff bosom, French cuffs, and a wing-type collar is worn with the Army white evening mess uniform when it is worn with the white vest and white bow tie.

22-8. Headgear

  1. The Army white service cap is the authorized headgear for wear with the Army white mess and white evening mess uniforms. (See para 18-8 of this regulation for a complete description of the wear of the cap.)
  2. Personnel are not required to wear headgear with the Army white mess and white evening mess uniforms to evening social events.

22-9. Cape, Army blue

As an option, all officers are authorized to wear the Army blue cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army white mess and white evening mess uniforms after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See para 27-6 for design and wear policy.)

22-10. Cummerbund, black

  1. Design. The cummerbund will be made from a commercial design. It is made of silk or satin material, with four or five pleats running the entire length of the cummerbund.
  2. Wear. All male personnel are authorized to wear the black cummerbund with the Army white mess uniform. The cummerbund will be made of the same material as the bow tie, and is worn with the pleats facing down.

22-11. Vest, white

  1. Design. The vest will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The white vest is single breasted, cut low, with a rolling collar and pointed bottom, and fastened with three detachable, extra small white buttons.
  3. How worn. The white vest is worn with the white bow tie and white formal dress shirt with a wing collar, as part of the white evening mess uniform.

22-12. Items normally worn with the Army white mess and evening mess uniforms

  1. Accessories
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Cape (officers only) (para 27-6).
    3. Coat, black, all weather (para 27-8).
    4. Cuff links and studs.
  2. Gold (white mess only) (para 27-10(2)).
  3. White (white evening mess only) (para 27-10(1)).
  4. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  5. Headgear, cap, service white (para 18-8).
  6. Neckties.
    1. Black, bow (white mess only) (para 27-19).
    2. White, bow (evening white mess only) (para 27-19).
  7. Shirts, white.
    1. Semiformal, dress (para 27-22).
    2. Formal (para 27-22).
  8. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  9. Socks, black (para 27-24).
  10. Suspenders (para 27-25).
  11. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  12. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army white mess and evening mess uniforms.
    1. Aiguillette, dress (officers only) (para 28-26).
    2. Insignia.
  13. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ). Branch insignia is worn as prescribed in paras 22-5(1) and (3).
  14. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-8). Grade insignia is worn as prescribed in paras 22-5(1) and (2).
  15. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  16. Headgear insignia, cap, service, white (para 28-3).
  17. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  18. Decorations and service medals, miniature (para 29-9).
  19. U.S. badges (combat and special skill, dress miniature, and identification) (paras 29-17 and 29-18).

22-13. General guidelines

Personnel may wear the black dress gloves when wearing the black all-weather coat with these uniforms. Personnel may wear the white gloves with the basic uniform. The black oxford shoes with black socks are the only authorized footwear for these uniforms.

Chapter 23: Army White Mess, All-White Mess, and Evening White Mess Uniforms Female

23-1. Authorization for wear

  1. The Army white mess, all-white mess, and evening white mess uniforms are authorized for wear by all female personnel. Personnel normally wear these uniforms from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II, where they may wear them year-round (see CTA 50-900).
  2. There are two versions of the Army white jacket. The older version of the jacket is authorized for wear by officers only. The newer version of the jacket is authorized for wear by all females. Officers may continue to wear the older version jacket as long as it is serviceable.

23-2. Composition

There are three variations to the Army white mess uniform.

Figure 23-1. Army white mess uniform, other officers (new version jacket)

  1. The Army white mess uniform comprises the Army white jacket, the Army black knee-length skirt, the black cummerbund, and the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab (see fig 23-1).
  2. The Army all-white mess uniform comprises the Army white jacket, the Army white knee-length mess skirt, white cummerbund, and the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab (see fig 23-2).
  3. The Army white evening mess uniform comprises the Army white jacket, Army black full-length skirt, black cummerbund, and formal white blouse with black dress neck tab (see fig 23-3).

Figure 23-2. Army all-white mess uniform, enlisted (new version jacket)

Figure 23-3. Army white evening mess uniform, general officer (old version jacket)

  1. Figure 23-3 shows the Army white evening mess uniform with the old version of the white mess jacket.

23-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army white, all-white, and evening white mess uniforms.

  1. Social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat.
  2. Private, formal dinners or other private, formal social functions held after retreat.

23-4. Materials

  1. White jacket and skirt.
    1. Polyester and rayon blend fabric in gabardine weave, 6- or 8-ounce weight, Army white.
    2. Texturized polyester serge, 6.5-ounce weight, Army white.
  2. Black skirt, knee and full length.
    1. Wool tropical, 8.5-ounce weight, Army black shade 149.
    2. Polyester and wool blend fabric in tropical weave, 10-ounce weight, Army black shade 332.

23-5. Jacket, Army white mess

  1. Old version. The jacket is single breasted with a natural-waist length and a shawl-type collar. It has a two-piece front, and a two-panel back. The front pieces have three 20-ligne buttons on each side, and the shoulders have two loops for the attachment of shoulder boards. Each sleeve has a band of white braid, inch in width, with the lower edge of the band 3 inches from the bottom of the sleeve.
    1. Shoulder ornamentation and insignia, old version jacket (officers only).

Figure 23-11. Shoulder knot

  1. General officers. Detachable shoulder knots are worn on each shoulder. A description of shoulder knots is provided in paragraph 25-5(1). (See fig 23-11.)
  2. Other officers. Detachable shoulder boards are worn on each shoulder, snapped to the jacket through the shoulder loops, with the square end of the shoulder board positioned on the outside shoulder seam. A general description of shoulder boards is in paragraph 28-8 of this regulation.
  3. Jacket sleeve ornamentation and insignia, old version jacket.
    1. General officers wear a cuff of white mohair or mercerized cotton braid 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered white cloth or silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter, with one point facing upward. (See para 22-5(1) and figs 23-4 through 23-7 for size and position of stars.)
    2. Other officers wear a band of white mohair or mercerized cotton braid, inch wide, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve.

Figure 23-4. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, general

Figure 23-5. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, lieutenant general

Figure 23-6. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, major general

Figure 23-7. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, brigadier general

  1. New version. The jacket is cut along the natural waistline and is slightly curved to a peak in back and in front. The coat has a shawl collar with white, self-fabric facing, and is fully lined with an inside vertical pocket on the right side. The coat front has six gold 20-ligne buttons. Two 20-ligne buttons, joined by a gold or gold-colored chain about 1 inches long, are worn in the upper buttonholes.
    1. Shoulder ornamentation. Officer’s jackets have a device for the attachment of shoulder knots. A description of the shoulder knots is provided in paragraph 25-5(1) (see fig 23-11).
    2. Sleeve ornamentation.
  2. General officers wear a cuff of white mohair or mercerized cotton braid 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered white cloth or silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter and are worn with one point facing upward. (See para 22-5(1) and figs 23-4 through 23-7 for size and position of stars.)

Figure 23-8. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, field and company grade officers

Figure 23-9. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, warrant officers

  1. Other commissioned and warrant officers wear a band of white mohair or white mercerized cotton braid sewn on each sleeve, -inch wide, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of the braid on each sleeve. A trefoil is attached to the upper edge of the braid on each sleeve. It consists of a knot composed of three loops, one large upper loop and two small lower loops of -inch white soutache braid, interlaced at the points of crossing, with the ends of the knots resting on the sleeve braid. Officer grade insignia (non- subdued pin-on or embroidered white cloth) is worn vertically in the center of the space formed by the lower curves of the knot and the upper edge of the braid (see figs 23-8 and 23-9 and ).
  2. Previously authorized sleeve ornamentation, which consists of the sleeve band, the branch insignia centered in the space formed by the lower curves of the trefoil and the upper edge of the sleeve band, and the number of trefoils appropriate to the specific grade of the wearer, is authorized for wear for the life of the jacket. This option is for commissioned officers only, and it applies only to jackets purchased prior to 11 August 1975. This ornamentation is not authorized for jackets purchased after 11 August 1975.

Figure 23-10. Sleeve ornamentation, white mess, enlisted

  1. Enlisted personnel wear a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve (see fig 23-10).

23-6. Skirts

  1. The all-white mess uniform skirt is a white knee-length skirt, with a one-panel front and four-panel back of straight design, with a waistband and a zipper closure on the left side.
  2. The white mess skirt is a black knee-length skirt, with a one-panel front and a four-panel back of straight design, with a waistband and a zipper closure on the left side.
  3. The white evening mess skirt is a black full-length skirt, with a one-panel front and four-panel back of straight design, with a waistband, a zipper closure on the left side, and an overlapped center back pleat.

23-7. Blouse, white formal

The blouse is a tuck-in style made of polyester and cotton fabric, with a front closure containing seven removable dome-shaped buttons. On each side of the front opening, there are three vertical rows of ruffles. The blouse has short sleeves and a rounded collar.

23-8. Neck tab, black, dress

The material is polyester and cotton broadcloth, in Army shade 305. It is a quarter-moon neck tab, which fits under the collar of the white formal blouse.

23-9. Capes, Army black and blue

As an option, all female officers are authorized to wear the Army blue or the Army black cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army white uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See paras 27-6 and for a complete description of the wear of the cape.)

23-10. Cummerbunds, black and white

  1. The cummerbund will be made from a commercial design. It is made in either black or white silk or satin material, with four or five pleats running the entire length of the cummerbund.
  2. Wear. The black cummerbund is worn with the white mess and white evening mess uniforms. The white cummerbund is worn with the all-white mess uniform. The cummerbund is worn with the pleats facing down.
  3. Females who possess cummerbunds made from previously authorized materials may continue to wear them for as long as they are serviceable.

23-11. Headgear

No headgear is authorized for wear by female personnel with the Army white mess, all-white mess, or white evening mess uniforms.

23-12. Items normally worn with the Army white mess, all-white mess, and evening white mess uniforms

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Capes (officers only).
  2. Black (para 27-6).
  3. Blue (para 27-6).
  4. Coat, black all weather (para 27-8).
  5. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  6. Handbags.
    1. Black, dress (carried with white mess and evening mess only) (para 27-13).
    2. White, dress (carried with all-white mess only) (para 27-13).
  7. Shoes.
    1. Pumps, black (worn with white mess and evening white mess only) (paras 27-23 and ).
    2. Pumps, white (worn with all-white mess only) (paras 27-23 and ).
  8. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  9. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  10. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  11. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army white mess, all-white mess, and evening mess uniforms.
    1. Aiguillette, dress (officers only) (para 28-26).
    2. Insignia.
  12. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ). Branch insignia is worn as prescribed in paras 23-5(2) and 23-5(2).
  13. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-8). Grade insignia is worn as prescribed in paras 23-5(2) and 23-5(2).
  14. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  15. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  16. Decorations and service medals, miniature (para 29-9).
  17. U.S. badges (combat and special skill, dress miniature, and identification) (paras 29-17 and 29-18).

23-13. General guidelines

Personnel will wear knee-length mess skirts no longer than 1 inch above or 2 inches below the crease in the back of the knee. The black evening mess skirt is worn full length. Personnel may wear the black dress gloves when wearing the black all-weather coat. Personnel may wear white gloves with all uniforms. The black pumps with sheer stockings are the only authorized footwear for the white mess and white evening mess uniforms. The white pumps with sheer stockings are the only authorized footwear for the all-white mess uniform.

Chapter 24: Army Blue Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Male

24-1. Authorization for wear

The Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all male personnel.

24-2. Composition

Figure 24-1. Army blue mess uniform, general officers

Figure 24-2. Army blue evening mess uniform, other officers

Figure 24-3. Army blue mess uniform, enlisted

  1. The Army blue mess uniform comprises the Army blue jacket, dark- or light- blue high-waisted trousers, white semiformal dress shirt with a turndown collar, black bow tie, and black cummerbund (see figs 24-1, 24-2, and 24-3).
  2. The Army blue evening mess uniform comprises the Army blue jacket, dark- or light- blue high-waisted trousers, white formal dress shirt with a wing collar, white vest, and white bow tie (see fig 24-2).

24-3. Occasions for wear

The blue mess uniform is worn for black tie functions and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. The blue evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army personnel and corresponds to the civilian “white tie and tails.” The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms:

  1. Social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat.
  2. All private, formal social functions held after retreat.

24-4. Materials

  1. Jacket.
    1. Wool barathea, dark blue, 14-ounce weight, Army shade 150.
    2. Wool gabardine, dark blue, 11- or 14.5-ounce weight Army shade 150.
    3. Wool elastique, dark blue, 15-ounce weight, Army shade 150.
    4. Wool tropical, dark blue, 9-ounce weight, Army shade 150.
    5. Polyester and wool blend gabardine, dark blue, 9.5-ounce weight, Army shade 450.
    6. Polyester and wool blend fabric in plain weave, dark blue, 9.5-ounce tropical weight, Army shade 450.
  2. Trousers.
    1. General officers. The trousers will be made in the same material and shade (dark blue) as the jacket.
    2. Other officers and enlisted personnel. The trousers will be made in the same material as the jacket, except the color will be light blue, Army shade 151 or 451.
    3. Braid. Nylon gold-colored braid or synthetic metallic gold braid is more suitable than gold bullion when attached to lightweight fabrics (11 ounces or less).

24-5. Jacket, Army blue mess

  1. Design. The jacket will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The jacket, which is cut on the lines of an evening dress coat, descends to the point of the hips and is slightly curved to a peak in back and in front. Two 25-ligne buttons, joined by a small gold or gold-colored chain about 1 inches long, are worn in the upper buttonholes. The shoulders have a device for the attachment of shoulder knots on officer uniforms.
  3. Lapels. The lapels of the Army blue jacket are rayon, acetate, or other synthetic fabric with a satin face in the following colors:
    1. General officers, except chaplains: dark blue.
    2. All chaplains: black.
    3. All other officers: the first-named color of their basic branch of service. (See para 28-19.)
    4. Enlisted personnel: dark blue.

Figure 24-11. Shoulder knot

  1. Shoulder knots (officers only). (See fig 24-11.)
    1. General description. The shoulder knot is made from -inch diameter cord, of gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon. The shoulder knot is formed of four plaits composed of three cords interlaced as one, and rounded at the top with a gold 20-ligne button positioned in the upper end of the knot. The knot is no more than 5 inches in length and 2 inches in width, conforming to the shoulder, and stiffened on the underside with a flexible backing, covered with dark blue or black cloth. The flexible backing has an attachment that is suitable for fastening it to the shoulders of the jacket (see fig 24-11).
    2. How worn. Officers wear the shoulder knots attached to the shoulders of the Army blue jacket.
  2. Sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers wear a cuff of blue-black velvet braid 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. A band of oak leaves in groups of two, 1 inch in width, are embroidered on each cuff of braid, 1 inch below the upper edge, in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside sleeve 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued, metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter and are worn with one point facing upward. The following describes general officer stars.

Figure 24-4. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, general

  1. General insignia is four stars, with 1 inches between the midpoints, and with the stars centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 24-4).

Figure 24-5. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, lieutenant general

  1. Lieutenant general insignia is three stars, with 1? inches between the midpoints, and with the middle star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 24-5).

Figure 24-6. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, major general

  1. Major general insignia is two stars, with 2 inches between the midpoints and with the stars centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 24-6).

Figure 24-7. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, brigadier general

  1. Brigadier general insignia is one star centered horizontally on the outside sleeves (see fig 24-7).

Figure 24-8. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, field and company grade officers

Figure 24-9. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, warrant officers

  1. Other commissioned and warrant officers wear a -inch braid consisting of two -inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braids, placed on each sleeve inch apart on a silk stripe of the first-named color of their basic branch. The bottom of the braid is positioned parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve. A trefoil is attached to the upper edge of the braid on each sleeve. It consists of a knot composed of three loops, one large upper loop and two small lower loops of inch gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored braid, interlaced at the points of crossing, with the ends of the knots resting on the sleeve braid. Officer grade insignia (non- subdued pin-on or embroidered silver bullion) is worn vertically in the center of the space formed by the lower curves of the knot and the upper edge of the braid (see figs 24-8 and 24-9 and ).
  2. Previously authorized sleeve ornamentation, which consists of the sleeve band, the branch insignia centered in the space formed by the lower curves of the trefoil and the upper edge of the sleeve band, and the number of trefoils appropriate to the specific grade of the wearer, is authorized for wear for the life of the jacket. This option is for commissioned officers only, and it applies only to jackets purchased prior to 11 August 1975. This ornamentation is not authorized for jackets purchased after 11 August 1975.

Figure 24-10. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, enlisted

  1. Enlisted personnel wear a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon, 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve (see fig 24-10).

24-6. Trousers, Army blue

  1. Design. The trousers will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The blue trousers are cut along the lines of civilian dress trousers, with a high waist and without pleats, cuffs, or hip pockets. Personnel will wear only the high-waisted trousers with these uniforms. Suspenders are authorized for wear, but they may not be visible when worn. (See para 24-4, above, for additional information on the trousers.)
  3. Trouser leg ornamentation. The trouser leg ornamentation consists of an ornamental braid worn on the outside seam of the trouser leg, from the bottom of the waistband to the bottom of the trouser leg, as follows:
    1. General officers have two -inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braids, spaced inch apart.
    2. All other officers and enlisted personnel have one 1 inch, two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braid.

24-7. Shirts, white dress

  1. Semiformal. A commercial, white, long-sleeved semiformal dress shirt with a soft bosom, French cuffs, and a standard turndown collar is worn with the Army blue mess uniform.
  2. Formal. A commercial, white, long-sleeved formal dress shirt with a stiff bosom, French cuffs, and a wing-type collar is worn with the Army blue evening mess uniform.

24-8. Headgear

  1. The Army blue service cap is the authorized headgear for wear with the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms. (See para 20-8 for a complete description.)
  2. Personnel are not required to wear headgear with the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms to evening social events.

24-9. Cape, Army blue

As an option, all officers are authorized to wear the Army blue cape instead of the black all-weather coat when wearing the Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See para 27-6 for design and wear policy.)

24-10. Cummerbund, black

  1. Design. The cummerbund will be made from a commercial design. It is made of silk or satin material, with four or five pleats running the entire length of the cummerbund.
  2. Wear. All male personnel are authorized to wear the black cummerbund with the Army blue mess uniform. The cummerbund will be made of the same material as the bow tie, and it is worn with the pleats facing down.

24-11. Vest, white

  1. Design. The vest will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The white vest is single breasted, cut low, with a rolling collar and pointed bottom, and fastened with three detachable, extra small white buttons.
  3. Wear. The white vest is worn with the Army blue evening mess uniform.

24-12. Items normally worn with the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Cape (officers only) (para 27-6).
    3. Coat, black, all-weather (para 27-8).
    4. Cuff links and studs.
  2. Gold (blue mess only) (para 27-10(2)).
  3. White (blue evening mess only) (para 27-10(1)).
  4. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  5. Headgear.
    1. Cap, service, blue (para 20-8).
    2. Cap, cold weather, AG 489 (para 27-5).
  6. Neckties.
    1. Black, bow (blue mess only) (para 27-19).
    2. White, bow (blue evening mess only) (para 27-19).
  7. Scarf, black (para 27-21)
  8. Shirts, white.
    1. Semiformal, dress (para 27-22).
    2. Formal (para 27-22).
  9. Shoes, oxford, black (para 27-23).
  10. Socks, black (para 27-24).
  11. Suspenders (para 27-25).
  12. Undergarments, white (para 27-28).
  13. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms.
    1. Aiguillette, dress (officers only) (para 28-26).
    2. Insignia.
  14. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ). Officers wear branch insignia as prescribed in para 24-5(1) and (3).
  15. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-8). Officers wear grade insignia as prescribed in para 24-5(1) and (2).
  16. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  17. Headgear insignia, cap, service, white (para 28-3).
  18. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  19. Decorations and service medals, miniature (para 29-9).
  20. U.S. badges (combat and special skill, dress miniature, and identification) (paras 29-17 and 29-18).

24-13. General guidelines

Personnel may wear the black dress gloves, black scarf, and the AG 489 cold-weather cap when wearing the black all-weather coat. Personnel may wear white gloves with the basic uniforms. The black oxford shoes with black socks are the only authorized footwear for these uniforms. (See paras 28-10 and 28-19 for information on lapel facing. See para 28-10 for information on color of ornamentation and branch insignia for detailed officers.)

Chapter 25: Army Blue Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Female

25-1. Authorization for wear

The Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all female personnel.

25-2. Composition

Figure 25-1. Army blue mess uniform, general officers

Figure 25-2. Army blue mess uniform, enlisted

  1. The Army blue mess uniform comprises the Army blue jacket, the Army blue knee-length skirt, the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab, and the black cummerbund (see figs 25-1 and 25-2 and ).

Figure 25-3. Army blue evening mess uniform, other officers

  1. The Army blue evening mess uniform comprises the Army blue jacket, the Army blue full-length skirt, the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab, and the black cummerbund (see fig 25-3).

25-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms.

  1. Social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat.
  2. All private, formal social functions held after retreat.
  3. The Army blue mess evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army female personnel.

25-4. Materials

  1. Wool barathea, dark blue, 14-ounce weight, Army shade 150 or 450.
  2. Wool gabardine, dark blue, 11- or 14.5-ounce weight, Army shade 150 or 450.
  3. Wool elastique, dark blue, 15-ounce weight, Army shade 150 or 450.
  4. Wool tropical, dark blue, 9-ounce weight, Army shade 150 or 450.
  5. Polyester and wool blend gabardine, dark blue, 9.5-ounce weight, Army shade 450.
  6. Polyester and wool blend fabric in plain weave, dark blue, 9.5-ounce tropical weight, Army shade 450.

25-5. Jacket, Army blue mess

  1. Design. The jacket will be made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The jacket is cut along the lines of an evening dress coat, descending to the point of the hips and slightly curved to a peak in back and in front. The coat has a notched collar with a branch of service colored lapel insert and is fully lined, with an inside vertical pocket on the right side. The coat front has six gold 20-ligne buttons. Two 20-ligne buttons, joined by a gold or gold-colored chain about 1 inches long, are worn in the upper buttonholes. The shoulders have a device for the attachment of shoulder knots on officer uniforms.
  3. Lapels. The lapels of the Army blue jacket are rayon, acetate, or other synthetic fabric with a satin face in the following colors.
    1. General officers, except chaplains: dark blue.
    2. All chaplains: black.
    3. All other officers: the first named color of their basic branch of service. (See para 28-19.)
    4. Enlisted personnel: dark blue.

Figure 25-11. Shoulder knot

  1. Shoulder knots (officers only). (See fig 25-11.)
    1. General description. The shoulder knot is made from -inch diameter cord of gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon. The shoulder knot is formed of four plaits, composed of three cords interlaced as one, and rounded at the top with a gold 20-ligne button positioned in the upper end of the knot. The knot is no more than 4 inches in length and 1?; inches in width, conforming to the shoulder and stiffened on the underside with a flexible backing, covered with dark blue or black cloth. The flexible backing has an attachment that is suitable for fastening it to the shoulders of the jacket.
    2. How worn. Officers wear the shoulder knots attached to the shoulders of the Army blue jacket.
  2. Sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers wear a cuff of blue-black velvet braid, 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. A band of oak leaves in groups of two, 1 inch in width, are embroidered on each cuff of braid, 1 inch below the upper edge, in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside of the sleeve, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued, metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter and are worn with one point facing upward. The following describes general officer stars:

Figure 25-4. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, general

  1. General insignia is four stars, with 1 inches between the midpoints, centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-4).

Figure 25-5. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, lieutenant general

  1. Lieutenant general insignia is three stars, with 1? inches between the midpoints, with the middle star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-5).

Figure 25-6. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, major general

  1. Major general insignia is two stars, with 2 inches between the midpoints and centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-6).

Figure 25-7. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, brigadier general

  1. Brigadier general insignia is one star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-7).

Figure 25-8. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, field and company grade officers

Figure 25-9. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, warrant officers

  1. Other commissioned and warrant officers wear a -inch braid consisting of two – inch two-vellum gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon braids, placed on each sleeve inch apart on a silk stripe of the first-named color of their basic branch. The bottom of the braid is positioned parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve. A trefoil is attached to the upper edge of the braid on each sleeve. It consists of a knot composed of three loops, one large upper loop and two small lower loops of inch gold, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored braid, interlaced at the points of crossing, with the ends of the knots resting on the sleeve braid. Officer grade insignia (non- subdued pin-on or embroidered silver bullion) is worn vertically in the center of the space formed by the lower curves of the knot and the upper edge of the braid (see figs 25-8 and 25-9 and ).
  2. Previously authorized sleeve ornamentation, which consists of the sleeve band, the branch insignia centered in the space formed by the lower curves of the trefoil and the upper edge of the sleeve band, and the number of trefoils appropriate to the specific grade of the wearer, is authorized for wear for the life of the jacket. This option is for commissioned officers only, and applies only to jackets purchased prior to 11 August 1975. This ornamentation is not authorized for jackets purchased after 11 August 1975.

Figure 25-10. Sleeve ornamentation, blue mess, enlisted

  1. Enlisted personnel wear a ?;-inch soutache braid of gold-colored nylon or rayon, 3 inches above the bottom of each sleeve (see fig 25-10).

25-6. Skirts

  1. The Army blue mess skirt is knee length, with a one-piece front with waist darts (one on each side), a four-piece back, a slide-fastener closure on the left side, and a sewn-on waistband that is closed with three hooks and eyes. The skirt is fully lined.
  2. The Army blue evening mess skirt is full length, with a one-piece front with waist darts (one on each side), a four-piece back, a slide-fastener closure on the left side, a sewn-on waistband that is closed with three hooks and eyes, and an overlapped center back pleat. The skirt is fully lined.

25-7. Blouse, white formal

The blouse is a tuck-in style made of polyester and cotton fabric with a front closure containing seven removable dome-shaped buttons. On each side of the front opening, there are three vertical rows of ruffles. The blouse has short sleeves and a rounded collar.

25-8. Neck tab, black, dress

The material is polyester and cotton broadcloth, in Army shade 305. It is a quarter-moon neck tab, which fits under the collar of the white formal blouse.

25-9. Capes, Army black and blue

As an option, all female officers are authorized to wear the Army blue or the Army black cape, instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army blue uniform after duty hours. Enlisted personnel may not wear the cape. (See paras 27-6 and for a complete description.)

25-10. Cummerbund, black

The cummerbund will be made from a commercial design. It is made of silk or satin material, with four or five pleats running the entire length of the cummerbund. The black cummerbund is worn with the pleats facing down.

25-11. Headgear

No headgear is authorized for wear by female personnel with the Army blue mess or blue evening mess uniforms.

25-12. Items normally worn with the Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Capes.
  2. Black (para 27-6).
  3. Blue (para 27-6).
  4. Coat, black all weather (para 27-8).
  5. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  6. Handbag, black, dress fabric (para 27-13).
  7. Scarf, black (para 27-21).
  8. Shoes, pumps, black (paras 27-23 and ).
  9. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  10. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  11. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  12. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army blue mess and evening mess uniforms.
    1. Aiguillette, dress (officers only) (para 28-26).
    2. Insignia.
  13. Branch (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ). Officers wear branch insignia as prescribed in para 25-5(1) and (3).
  14. Grade (paras 28-5 through 28-8). Officers wear grade insignia as prescribed in para 25-5(1) and (2).
  15. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  16. Service stripes (enlisted personnel only) (para 28-27).
  17. Decorations and service medals, miniature (para 29-9).
  18. U.S. badges (combat and special skill, dress miniature, and identification) (paras 29-17 and 29-18).

25-13. General guidelines

Personnel will wear knee-length mess skirts no longer than 1 inch above or 2 inches below the crease in the back of the knee. The blue evening mess skirt is worn full length. Personnel may wear the black dress gloves and black scarf when wearing the black all-weather coat. Personnel may wear white gloves with all uniforms. The black pumps or the black fabric pumps with sheer stockings are the authorized footwear for the blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms. (See paras 28-10 and 28-19 for information on lapel facings. (See para 28-10 for information on color of ornamentation and branch insignia for detailed officers.)

Chapter 26: Army Black Mess and Evening Mess Uniforms Female

26-1. Authorization for wear

The Army black mess and black evening mess uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all female officers. The Army blue mess and blue evening mess uniforms replaced the Army black mess and evening mess uniforms. The wear-out date for the Army black mess and evening mess uniforms is 30 September 2003. Effective 1 October 2003, only the blue mess and evening mess uniforms may be worn for the occasions listed in para 26-3, below. Enlisted females are not authorized to wear the black mess uniforms.

26-2. Composition

Figure 26-1. Army black mess uniform, other officers

  1. The Army black mess uniform comprises the Army black jacket, the Army black knee-length skirt, the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab, and the black cummerbund (see fig 26-1).

Figure 26-2. Army black evening mess uniform, general officers

  1. The Army black evening mess uniform comprises the Army black jacket, the Army black full-length skirt, the formal white blouse with black dress neck tab, and the black cummerbund (see fig 26-2).

26-3. Occasions for wear

The following are appropriate occasions for personnel to wear the Army black mess and black evening mess uniforms:

  1. Social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat.
  2. All private, formal social functions held after retreat.

26-4. Materials

  1. Wool tropical, 8.5-ounce weight, black, Army shade 149.
  2. Polyester and wool blend fabric in tropical 10-ounce weight, black, Army shade 332.

26-5. Jacket, Army black mess

  1. Design. The jacket is made from an approved specification or pattern.
  2. General description. The jacket is single-breasted with a natural-waist length and a shawl-type collar. It has a two-piece front on each side, and a two-panel back. The front pieces have three 20-ligne buttons on each side, and the shoulders have two loops for the attachment of shoulder boards or shoulder knots.
  3. Shoulder ornamentation and insignia.
    1. General officers. Detachable shoulder knots are worn on each shoulder, fastened to the shoulder loops and positioned with the button on the inside shoulder seam nearest the collar. A description of shoulder knots is provided in para 25-5(1). All general officers will wear the shoulder knots attached to the shoulders of the Army black mess jacket.
    2. Other commissioned and warrant officers. Detachable shoulder boards are worn on each shoulder snapped to the jacket through the shoulder loops, with the square end of the shoulder board positioned on the outside shoulder seam. (See para 28-8 for a general description of shoulder boards.)
  4. Sleeve ornamentation.
    1. General officers wear a cuff of blue-black velvet braid, 4 inches in width, positioned ?; inch from the bottom edge of each sleeve. A band of oak leaves in groups of two, 1 inch in width, are embroidered on each cuff of braid, 1 inch below the upper edge, in gold bullion, synthetic metallic gold, or gold-colored nylon or rayon. General officer grade insignia is centered on the outside of the sleeve, 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. When general officers wear their branch insignia, it is centered on the outside of the sleeves 1 inch above the upper edge of the cuff braid. Grade insignia is positioned 1 inch above the branch insignia. If branch insignia is worn, general officers will wear the non-subdued, metal pin-on insignia. Grade insignia is embroidered silver bullion. General officer stars are 1 inch in diameter and are worn with one point facing upward. The following describes general officer stars:
  5. General insignia is four stars, with 1 inches between the midpoints, centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-4).
  6. Lieutenant general insignia is three stars, with 1? inches between the midpoints, with the middle star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-5).
  7. Major general insignia is two stars, with 2 inches between the midpoints, centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-6).
  8. Brigadier general insignia is one star centered horizontally on the outside of the sleeves (see fig 25-7).
  9. Other commissioned and warrant officers wear a band of black mohair braid or black mercerized cotton braid, inch wide, sewn on each sleeve, with the lower edge parallel to, and 3 inches above the bottom edge of each sleeve. Detachable shoulder boards are worn on each shoulder, snapped to the jacket through the shoulder loops, with the square end of the shoulder board positioned on the outside shoulder seam. (See para 28-8 for a description of shoulder boards.)

26-6. Skirts

  1. The Army black mess skirt is the same skirt worn with the white mess uniform. It is a black knee-length skirt, with a one-panel front and four-panel back of straight design, with a waistband and a zipper closure on the left side.
  2. The Army black evening mess skirt is a black full-length skirt, with one-panel front and four-panel back of straight design, with a waistband, a zipper closure on the left side, and an overlapped center back pleat.

26-7. Blouse, white formal

The blouse is a tuck-in style made of polyester and cotton fabric, with a front closure containing seven removable dome-shaped buttons. On each side of the front opening, there are three vertical rows of ruffles. The blouse has short sleeves and a rounded collar.

26-8. Neck tab, black, dress

The material is polyester and cotton broadcloth, in Army shade 305. It is a quarter-moon neck tab, which fits under the collar of the white formal blouse.

26-9. Capes, Army black and blue

As an option, all female officers are authorized to wear the Army blue or the Army black cape instead of the black all-weather coat, when wearing the Army black uniform after duty hours. (See paras 27-6 and for a complete description.)

26-10. Cummerbund, black

The cummerbund will be made from a commercial design. It is made of silk or satin material, with four or five pleats running the entire length of the cummerbund. The black cummerbund is worn with the pleats facing down.

26-11. Headgear

No headgear is authorized for wear with the Army black mess or black evening mess uniforms.

26-12. Items normally worn with the Army black mess and black evening mess uniforms

  1. Accessories.
    1. Buttons (para 27-4).
    2. Capes.
  2. Black (para 27-6).
  3. Blue (para 27-6).
  4. Coat, black all weather (para 27-8).
  5. Gloves.
    1. Black, leather, unisex, dress (only when the black all-weather coat is worn) (para 27-12).
    2. White, dress (para 27-12).
  6. Handbag, black, dress fabric (para 27-13).
  7. Scarf, black (para 27-21).
  8. Shoes, pumps, black (paras 27-23 and ).
  9. Stockings, sheer (para 27-24).
  10. Umbrella, black (para 27-27).
  11. Undergarments (para 27-28).
  12. Insignia, awards, badges, and accouterments worn on the Army black mess and evening mess uniforms.
    1. Aiguillette, dress (officers only) (para 28-26).
    2. Insignia.
  13. Branch insignia (paras 28-10 and 28-12 and ). Officers wear branch insignia as prescribed in para 26-5(1).
  14. Grade insignia (paras 28-5 through 28-8). Officers wear grade insignia as prescribed in para 26-5(1) and (2).
  15. Regimental distinctive insignia (para 28-23).
  16. Decorations and service medals, miniature (para 29-9).
  17. U.S. badges (combat and special skill, dress miniature, and identification) (paras 29-17 and 29-18).

26-13. General guidelines

Personnel will wear knee-length mess skirts no longer than 1 inch above or 2 inches below the crease in the back of the knee. The black evening mess skirt is worn full length. Personnel may wear the black dress gloves and black scarf when wearing the black all-weather coat. Personnel may wear white gloves with all uniforms. The black fabric pumps with sheer stockings are the only authorized footwear for these uniforms.

Revisions

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